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Bike Ramp for Stairs Answered

While visiting Lisbon, Portugal for OFFF 2009, I saw this bike ramp on a flight of stairs. I often carry my bike up and down stairs to train and subway stations, and would love to see more of these ramps around town.

Discussions

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Plasmana

9 years ago

That is really cool.

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ll.13

9 years ago

I saw something similar in a video about bike transport in the Netherlands, except it was more like a shallow gutter running along side the stairs

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Weissensteinburg

9 years ago

That's awesome! Did you see anybody actually use it? Seems like it'd be hard to ride up (friction), and pretty easy to fall going down.

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n8manWeissensteinburg

Reply 9 years ago

I think it is used for rolling the bike up the stairs.

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Weissensteinburgn8man

Reply 9 years ago

That's not nearly as thrilling. More practical, but not thrilling.

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ewilhelmWeissensteinburg

Reply 9 years ago

I use to ride my bike down stairs all around MIT's campus. Christy was particularly impressed when I rode down the super-narrow and steep stairs in her dorm. Then I took up jumping my bike down flights of stairs and wound up breaking my wrists.

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Honusewilhelm

Reply 9 years ago

That ramp is awesome! I had a friend that did a nose wheelie down several flights of stairs- and not on purpose. He had a bit more luck than you did and no bones were broken. Wrists take a long time to heal....... you need a long travel suspension bike! I've been on some rides with friends that were Boston bike messengers- definitely an eye opening experience.......

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canidaHonus

Reply 9 years ago

He had a suspension bike - that was the problem. Sub-zero weather means your shocks become super-stiff, so while he expected the shocks to take most of the force it instead transferred directly through his wrists. Not smart.

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Honuscanida

Reply 9 years ago

Ahh... back in the good ol' elastomer suspension days. Not so much a problem with air/oil/coil springs these days. I've ridden quite a bit in sub zero weather here in Boulder and elastomers just don't work below freezing, even the microcellular (MCU) variety. Back in the early 90's when I worked in R&D at Onza we made clipless pedals that used an elastomer bumper for the cleat retention and I tried explaining to them that they wouldn't work in cold weather but nobody listened.... That was a really great time to be in the mountain bike business because everything was so new and fun and experimental. A lot of those products that came to market never really should have seen the light of day.....

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canidaHonus

Reply 9 years ago

Exactly! Those elastomers didn't do well in Boston winters. Integrating elastomers into clipless pedals sounds like another truly inspired idea.

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Honuscanida

Reply 9 years ago

I sense just a smattering of sarcasm..... LOL! Those pedals were my worst nightmare- customers either swore by them or swore at them. My personal favorite bad idea contender was the bungee cord suspended bike I rode at the Taipei show- all the spring and no damping- you just bounced all over. I recall the company slogan was "It's the more wonderful than you can believe it!" Ahh....the memories. :)

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canidacanida

Reply 9 years ago

I think it was 1996.

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Goodhartcanida

Reply 9 years ago

Experience if both the best and cruelest teacher ;-)

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ewilhelmHonus

Reply 9 years ago

In that particular accident, I broke the navicular bone in my wrist and it took 3 months to heal. Once healed, I promptly rebroke it, and two other bones in my wrist, in yet another mountain biking accident. I have since given up mountain biking, and now focus on road biking.

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Honusewilhelm

Reply 9 years ago

I also fractured my navicular bone in my right wrist in a bike accident- I've heard that particular bone takes longer to heal than most any other bone in the human body. I also had a bike accident where I broke my nose, fractured a tooth, got six stitches in the top of my nose and six stitches in my upper lip as well as a massive hematoma on my knee. Fun times! I used to be a hardcore roadie (15,000 miles/yr) but I enjoy both road and mountain bikes. My great wrecks seem to be spread equally between the two!

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Keith-Kidewilhelm

Reply 9 years ago

Half the thrill but half the hospital bill.....wise choice.

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Lithium Rainewilhelm

Reply 9 years ago

I gotta ask - how do you bathe, get dressed, eat, use the bathroom, brush your teeth or complete your studies without the use of your hands? :D

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ewilhelmLithium Rain

Reply 9 years ago

I've only broken one wrist at a time (but broken them both, and in the case of my right, multiple times). In this particular case, the cast only went to my elbow, and I had use of my fingers. While still wearing the cast, my band won MIT's battle of the bands with me playing bass, and I continued to rock climb. For the most part, just my thumb was immobilized.

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canidaewilhelm

Reply 9 years ago

I was definitely impressed by that nasty stinky cast you had to wear for three months, and even more impressed when you broke the exact same bone again one month after the first cast came off. That armpit-high wrist cast got pretty nasty.

This is why you now ride a road bike.

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KentsOkaycanida

Reply 9 years ago

>_< See, that's why I'm purchasing a classic Corvette, no need for injuries for impressiveness.

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caitlinsdadcanida

Reply 9 years ago

I too would be impressed by the level of stupi intelligence...


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Keith-Kidcanida

Reply 9 years ago

AHAHAHAAA!!! Good times, good times.....

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kelseymhChicken2209

Reply 9 years ago

How exactly does the helmet prevent wrist fractures? Just curious...

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Keith-Kidkelseymh

Reply 9 years ago

It reduces the impact of the wazoo by redirecting it to the fruit cake. It's simple physics!

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GoodhartKeith-Kid

Reply 9 years ago

simple physics? Or physics for the simple (not that there's anything wrong with being simple; and not that I am calling you simple or anything I had better cut bait at this point.....)

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Sunbanksewilhelm

Reply 9 years ago

That would be awesome :D Except for the wrist breaking part.

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Keith-KidSunbanks

Reply 9 years ago

Are you kidding? That's the best part! No pain no gain! EXTREEEEME!!!!!!!!!!

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PKMWeissensteinburg

Reply 9 years ago

I've tried riding one- you can't steer, and given that's how you maintain your balance on a bike it's a bit of a non-starter. If you use the handrail at the side to keep your balance then you end up braking one-handed which is just nasty- on a decent mountain bike riding down the stairs is actually easier. Or you could push your bike on it, as it's designed for :)

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Keith-KidWeissensteinburg

Reply 9 years ago

Maybe special bike stairs? Add some bumps to it to avoid it falling back, yet make it easily climbable? Anyone? Hint, hint?

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Keith-KidWeissensteinburg

Reply 9 years ago

Hmm...What I have in mind probably makes sense, I just dont know how to explain it...

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caitlinsdad

9 years ago

It would probably be an open invitation for all the sk8ters to grind that rail. Then again, we have people that ride on top of the subway cars to surf the subways.

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canidaewilhelm

Reply 9 years ago

Remind me, how many bones did you break skateboarding?

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ewilhelmewilhelm

Reply 9 years ago

Also fairly serious head trauma. Hey, maybe that's why I started this site!!!

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Keith-Kidcanida

Reply 9 years ago

He skateboarded?! If so, that's +27 cool points for ewilhelm. If he broke his bones that's another +13......