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Bob Pease is dead Answered

Bob Pease, the Analog design engineer who, while working for National Semiconductors,  developed devices like the LM317 regulator amongst many others, died yesterday in a car crash in Silicon Valley.

Bob was a legendary figure to any engineer working in the analog domain. He died leaving the memorial service for another legend, Jim WIlliams of Linear technology, who died of a massive stroke last week.

Bob was one of the nicest guys in the business, and mentored dozens of engineers in his long career.

Discussions

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Goodhart

7 years ago

*Sigh*, That makes me a bit sad.

I have a number of letters somewhere from him, one where he shares a design with me on a device much more devious then the Annoyatron, but similar in effect (albeit much more annoying :-)

Troubleshooting Analog Circuits (EDN Series for Design Engineers)  still sells in paperback for over $40.  

I still refer to MANY of his Peese Porridge articles and the "What's all this....." entitled ones.

I never got to meet him in person, but he responded to EVERY letter I ever wrote him, and I wasn't even an engineer in any way shape nor form....he loved to help people and he loved to ponder things....he will DEFINATELY be missed.

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iceng

7 years ago

When the big add for the WOM by National Semi came to our eng group,
we convinced a Jr EE ( Hasmukh T. Shaw ) to write and ask for a sample.

A couple of weeks later he received a multi page Laurel & Hardy coloring book.

In memory of Bob who has been a part of my EE life as tubes were and transistors are now.

Alex....

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steveastroukiceng

Reply 7 years ago

The reaction to Bob's death in the electronics world has been amazing.

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verence

7 years ago

Great guy, met him once at a presentation in Stuttgart, Germany.

The irony: He wrote a book about driving: 'How to Drive into Accidents - And How Not to' (got a copy signed by him).

On page 305 he says: 'Anyhow, even for short trips, just about everybody should have their seat belt and shoulder-belt ON, before you start. No more lecturing needed. You will do it.'

Unfortunately, he didn't do it.

RIP

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LargeMouthBass

7 years ago

I get tons of trade journal emails at work, most of which get deleted, but I would always check out his articles in electronic design as soon as I got them.

I wish I could have seen one of his famous presentations in person, delivered using "analog power point" (an overhead projecter). But alas, no.

I have a copy of his analog troubleshooting book at work, and have refered to it from time to time when trying to figure out some vexing engineering problem.

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steveastroukLargeMouthBass

Reply 7 years ago

He was great in person, as you would expect - I met and talked to him for 10 minutes or so when he was in the UK a couple of years ago.

He had one of the best bull detectors in the business.

Steve

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iceng

7 years ago

He was a fun EE who climbed mountains with a phone charged by sunlight.
"What's All This Stuff ?"
He originated the WOM concept and National Semi marketed it to the military.
At least he didn't suffer.

Alex.........

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oRelyTo

7 years ago

Bowed head. RIP.