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Get electromagnetic pulses from a gas igniter Answered

Hi, here I have a common gas igniter like this:
http://s10.postimg.org/r55cvgt9l/gasigniter.jpg

Well, I removed the circuit from the box, then I shorted the two terminals, using various kind of coils (thick wire, thin wire, in various configurations and with different turns), but seems that this circuit is unable to generate electromagnetic pulses; I've tried to turn on a fluorescent lamp, to cause interferences to a pocket calculator (as I can see in various videos on youtube), but nothing happens.
If I remove the coil from the terminals I am able to get nice sparks. So, why this circuit won't work as expected? I miss something? However this is the circuit:
http://s4.postimg.org/fgd78werx/ignitercircuit.jpg

Please note that I'm aware of the fact that these kind of circuit could be dangerous; I'm taking all possible precautions (I'm using it far from any electrical device, I'm using isolated gloves, and so on). I just want to make this circuit for fun.

Many thanks.

Discussions

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Downunder35m

3 years ago

You don't understand the difference between high voltage pulses and high energy pulses.
These igniters produce a high voltage with a high frequency - the energy levels are tiny as otherwise it would not work with batteries.
For a small EM pulse you need to charge a capacitor rated for the voltage and purpose and once fully charged it will be discharged into the EM coil.
Don't want to spoil your experiments but usually the circuit from a disposable flash light is used for these....
Google it ;)

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akopelumenuscuDownunder35m

Reply 3 years ago

Hi, the fact is that I got inspiration from this instructable (click) which doesn't rely on a capacitor, but instead on a high voltage generator, and from the videos seems to work very well: isn't the operating principle, similar to the circuit which I'm using?

Many thanks.

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Downunder35makopelumenuscu

Reply 3 years ago

You use a little toy, in the Instructable a proper igniter is used - I have a few of those...
The good one uses multiply capacitors on the output stage to get sparks of up 5cm...
You might get away by adding a spark gap.
The igniter produces the high voltage only if it can build up, using a spark gap between igniter and your coil makes sure you actually get a HV pulse going into your coil.

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akopelumenuscuDownunder35m

Reply 3 years ago

Well, I've tried adding a spark gap between the igniter and the coil,
but it still doesn't work (I've also tried a power supply of 3 volt
instead of 1,5 volt - in this way I noticed that the sparks were more
fast, so I can guess an higher frequency).

If I can't do more than these attempts, I will go to buy a disposable camera with flash.

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Downunder35makopelumenuscu

Reply 3 years ago

You can not get more energy out than what the charged capacitor can give.
If you check the size of the capacitor in a flash cam you will know what I mean.
But do yourself a favour and wear thick rubber gloves when playing around with the flash circuit.
Check if the gloves are any good with your spark igniter - if no spark goes through them you are good to go.
A fully charged cap from the cam can severely burn your fingers if on the same hand and give you a severe heart attack if going through your body.
It is no problem to kill yourself with it if things go wrong.

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akopelumenuscuDownunder35m

Reply 3 years ago

Sure, I am totally aware of the dangerousness: I have a pair of good protection/insulated gloves.

However: I connected just one wire of the coil to the spark gap and I was able to "smash" the pocket calculator: it doesn't turn on anymore :-)

Anyway, if I attempt to turn on a fluorescent lamp, when the lamp is near to the coil, I can barely see a weak light which pulses. Why? I'm feeding the circuit with 3 volt