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Good values for a beginner capacitor assortment? Answered

Working at my desk, I realized I need a nice restock for my parts- I have a lot of resistors on order (pretty much the Radioshack assortment but cheaper), but I need capacitors. I dont know a whole lot of electronics, so I dont know what values are common and widely used- so I need to know what values would be good in a large capacitor assortment (Values anywhere from nf to 4700uf are available where I am ordering.. so a good large assortment)
Thanks!
-Astroboy907

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iceng

Best Answer 7 years ago

You never know how long the sales will last.
Use the lowest cost shipping as these components don't get damaged
in transit even if the box gets crumpled.

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iceng

7 years ago

Here is a place I have purchased items over the years with satisfaction.
They offer 1000 capacitors for $10 that is 10¢ each.  Go for it !!!! .....    A

capsboxG3060B.jpg

umm. no- far from that- as i am in HS and dont have a job yet. I just know a really cheap place (Tayda Electronics). Not highest quality, but have not had any problems/malfunctions so far.

For a HS student, unless you're planning on doing a LOT of experimentation and repair, I'd suggest buying parts as you need them for specific projects rather than buying large lots of parts which you "might" use, unless the package cost is lower than the onesie-twosie cost for ... let's say three to five projects.

Otherwise, you're tying up money that you might want to spend on other kinds of parts.

(Pros, in all fields, run into exactly the same question. How much stock do you keep on hand because you really expect it might sell at any moment, versus how much do you order when you need it. The large-bundle deal is cheaper per part, but if it includes parts that don't sell quickly you're losing the possible returns you'd get from investing that money in other kinds of stock or just leaving it in the bank, and if it includes parts that don't sell at all that's money you've flat-out lost.)

Back when I was getting started, hobbyists could get a fair distance by scrounging parts out of broken electronic devices. In these days of surface-mount components and LSI, that option has largely evaporated.

Hmm. I still have a pile of parts I rescued when I was your age. I wonder whether the local hackerspace would have any interest in them, or if there's an electronics hobby club at one of the local schools.

oops- sorry I checked again and the values extend into the 1 picofarad range

I saw this. It may be usefull.