85Views7Replies

Author Options:

HELP WITH PIEZOELECTRIC EXPERIMENTS? Answered

Hi,
I am a researcher and I am interested in the piezoelectric qualities of certain materials, specifically quartz or bone and wondered whether anyone had experience of passing sound through quartz/crystals/animal bones? Is it possible to use one of those material to carry sound? I know that glass windows can be used as large bone conducting speakers, just wondering if anyone has any experience of this?
I haven't done any hands on experiments myself as I am still at the research stage. Any advice would be appreciated and a big help!

Thanks

Discussions

0
None
Downunder35m

2 years ago

Anything that is dense enough will carry sound quite good, even water.
Sucktion or glue-on "speakers" that use basically any hard surface to be used as a speaker are available for years.
Makes me wonder how much research you have done or if you even tried a simple Google search...
;)

0
None
MaudiemaDownunder35m

Answer 2 years ago

Thanks downunder, yeah I have basically come across people on this site and you tube performing a number of different piezo experiments, but nothing with the particular materials that I am looking at (bones or crystal - being used directly as a speaker), I've spotted a lot of use of quartz or contact mice with LED's etc. I've come across glass being used, cups, tin cans as speakers and lots of interesting examples of people making their own bone conductive headphones. I was just hoping to get a little closer to what I was thinking of trying. I am also looking at water as conductor so this is relevant. Thanks!

0
None
Downunder35mMaudiema

Answer 2 years ago

Check out the flat panel speakers that use a glass or arcrylic panel.
Depending on price and overall quality you will notice that their sound quality is often far below expectations.
Before you go into crystals, bones or similar you might want to check on the effects of soundwaves first.
A speaker cone shows distortions at certain frequencies and if filled with liquid you will see drops bouncing and weird patterns forming in the surface.
Now think of how sound is actually created, for example why a piezo is only good for high frequencies and 30" speaker only for ver low frequencies.
The surface must be able produce enough controlled vibration to create a full sine wave of the frequency in question.
To make things even worse the self contained surface also produces so "stading waves" - like the waves bouncing off the walls of a small pond when you throw a rock in it.
These waves work against the sound you want to produce and must be cancelled out the best way possible if sound quality is a demand.
So to make it short: A crystal might work very well to transmit sound in the form of vibration like the bones in your ear but is very bad as an actual speaker due to the lack of moving surface area.

0
None
Josehf Murchison

2 years ago

Wood, bone, stone, and crystals, even sea shells have been used as musical instruments like flutes, horns, and didgeridoos since the beginning of man, just hollow it out and blow.

There are hundreds of piezo and other music Instructables.

0
None
MaudiemaJosehf Murchison

Answer 2 years ago

Thanks for the response, will take another look at the instructables.

0
None
Maudiemarickharris

Answer 2 years ago

Thanks for this! will check out you tube too.