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Headphone idea Answered

I have a pair of headphones as seen by the freaky looking girl below (I got it off the site, that sure as hell ain't me). These are exactly the same model as what's in the link, but theres a couple things I wanna do to better suite me. First off, I think these are intended for kids? They don't sit on my head normally because the head strap is a little short (any ideas?) but they sit with the headband hanging off the back of my head just as good.

They may seem fairly "crappy" and the speakers they included with them are shitty, just normal headphone speakers, maybe a little larger than average but nothing special. I wanted to up-grade the speakers with something maybe a little bigger (the ones in here sound pretty okay tho). I tried to see if these small surround sound speakers I had would fit, and the magnet is about 1cm too deep so that's out of the question unless I want to remove a whole lotta plastic with my dremel.

So I had a second idea, what about using pager/cell phone motors (would ps2 controller motors work? I have lots of those) and either having them receive the signal directly which I'm sure wouldn't do much unless it was a small pager motor with a small voltage requirement. But, what about a simple circuit, kind of like this mod which uses the sound output of a PSP to drive a circuit that uses "seperate" voltage (ie battery pack) to drive the motor to the sound.

My general idea is to have a pair of headphones that feel like you have a giant subwoofer strapped to your head. I know it can be done, I know the circuit isn't that complicated, but probably has enough parts, can someone help me get a jump start on this? I'm sure modifications to a pair of headphones is fairly straightforward. Also any suggestions on a new type of speaker that I could install would be appreciated.

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Man that picture is just f***** creepy.

........ I think ditto is the right word. xD

It's most likely a picture of "Califone's" CEO's "Special" daughter.

LMAO, she looks happy..... happy.... happy.... happ.... *yawn*... haaa.... *snoooozzz*

'(sarcasm}'Of course he does'sarcasm/'}...AH ITS watching ME

No LOL, I was hypnotized.... hypnotizzz..... hypnooo *yahhwwwnn*.... hyp.. ...hyy... *snores*

Splashes water on...umm Rocket something

. A transducer mounted just about anywhere on your head will conduct bass to the inner ear. Experiment with placement on the cups/headband/&c.; A dual-coil transducer (with crossover) on the headband will probably work best (less weight).

Huh what what? Placement eh? I was planning on putting one inside each earcup as theres nothing but empty space and the volume control knob on each side. Whats a dual coil transducer?

I'd avoid putting "subwoofer" type outputs directly into your ears in the confined space of a headphone muff. The pressure-fluctuation in your inner ear will do some cumulative, permanent damage, the kind that means you'll have trouble following conversations if more than two people are talking, and TV will become a world of subtitles.

. As one who used to think volume was everything, I have to believe your warnings are falling on ... ready? ... deaf ears. . And, yeppers, I have problems making sense of conversations in a noisy environment nowadays. :( Either that or EVERYONE starts mumbling.

Wow, people mumble in crowds I attend also :-)

No no no, just using the normal signal it recieves I wanted to power two vibrators that I was going to mount in the cup. As far as I know a motor with an off balance weight doesn't make pressure.

If it's fastened to the cup, it will drive the cup in and out whilst clamped over your ear - that could be an amplitude of 4 or 5mm, and a huge pressure-wave directly into the ear.

. A transducer converts one form of energy into another. Speakers/drivers convert electrical current into sound (mechanical energy). Microphones convert sound into electrical signals. . We've been over the dual-coil business before. Two coils on a common core/cone. . If you use some sort of "coneless speaker" (the "turn a wall into a speaker" thingies come to mind), you can mount it on the headband, so it touches your skull, and the sound will be conducted to your inner ear and will not radiate out into the room/house as much. Enough sound may conduct down the headband to the cups that the transducer may not need to be in direct contact with your head. Experiment.

. Rob the crossover(s) from one of the sub-woofers you've blown up. . If you use a dual-coil driver, you don't even need a crossover, unless you need to attenuate the treble (probably not necessary).

Well guessing that a regular electric motor (with said off balance weight) is probably a single coil with a single set of inputs, not dual coil like my "Non-blown" subwoofer. . Since when did subwoofers themselves come with crossovers built into them? Did you mean those car amps I have that don't work?? They have crossovers in them but being it's all integrated circuits into one main board I'm guessing I have slim chance of removing it and using it elsewhere.

. You need something that will add the bass from each channel, but keep the highs separated. Crossover is probably not the proper term, but I can't think of a better word. Subs weren't all that popular (too expensive/complicated) when I was interested in stereo gear. . I have serious doubts about the vibrator being a good solution - it will be limited to a single frequency. It may work better than what I think it will. . For proof-of-concept purposes, using a single-coil driver or the vibrator on just one channel should give you a good idea of how well it's going to work.

Well yes I do need something like a "Crossover" but I was hoping to have that intergrated into the said "circuit". The circuit I'm looking for wasn't specifically for just crossover reasons, if you noticed, a motor/transducer wouldn't do much plugged into a headphone jack, so I was looking for some kind of amplifier.

For the low cost, low tech answer I'd go with buying a pair of pretty cheap non amplified speakers for mp3s etc and putting the speaker unit in to the headphone housing, look for ones with speaker cones the same size as the actual cavity (diameter wise), that would give a pretty heavy duty bass response. I personally love sony's earphones, they were free with the phone and are great for bass and high notes and being the 'earplug' design they reduce sound by about 50%, they do have tiny drivers though but hanging them inside that housing might make a good combo. I think the bass response would be more helped by a modified lollipop... remember the ones that play sound through your teeth, that would be cheap too. Also when you're at home I like putting my stereo speakers either side of my head at a lower volume and letting the sound completely flood me, for kicks you could sit on the sub...

So I had a second idea, what about using pager/cell phone motors (would ps2 controller motors work? I have lots of those) and either having them receive the signal directly which I'm sure wouldn't do much unless it was a small pager motor with a small voltage requirement

I am a bit baffled as to why you want to turn on a motor with sound?

If the headphones are stereo, they would be wired much like a pair of stereo speakers that weren't headphones.

Large ear cups like those are notorious for helping ear infections get started (warm moisture holding cups) but they are probably the best at shielding one from "outside noise".

They are doing some really amazing things lately with small speakers.

I am a bit baffled as to why you want to turn on a motor with sound?

. Because just like using motors in game when you're using a ps2, they're to add to the game, like in this case, add a "faux" bass effect hopefully. Here's a good example, there isn't a single cone in those "butt kickers" but they still produce bass.

If the headphones are stereo, they would be wired much like a pair of stereo speakers that weren't headphones.

The headphones are stereo (albeit in series wiring configuration..I should fix that). They would be like a pair of stereo speakers? I have hooked an electric motor up to a stereo before and it does make sound, rather than moving, fairly unexciting, sometimes it'll spin but thats why I asked about a circuit for it to "Drive" the motors, while providing the music through it at the same time.

Large ear cups like those are notorious for helping ear infections get started (warm moisture holding cups) but they are probably the best at shielding one from "outside noise".

. Yes they probably are, I've never had an ear infection, but these are supposed to be non-bacterial non-the-less. And yes they're much quieter than your average.

They are doing some really amazing things lately with small speakers.

.Yes thats why I'd love to install something else into it. I just though of using a pair of $20 ipod speakers I bought (you know those shiny funny looking speakers that are on pretty much all ipod speakers you buy) and how they're probably about the same size but would be much louder, plus they even have an amplifier to go with. But then I just remembered how my friend borrowed it, I am sad...

Oh ok.

Because just like using motors in game when you're using a ps2, they're to add to the game, like in this case, add a "faux" bass effect hopefully

Ok, and that (transducers) were what Nacho spoke of, pressing one against a check bone or behind the ear for sound transference, rather then the speaker.

But I want to use the speaker AND "transducer" together with some kind of amplifier.

Yeah, I realize that now. *shrug* you are in new territory from my point of view :-)

Why it can't be that hard?? Leave the existing speakers in there, as far as mounting these "transducers" I can figure that out just fine but it's HOW to drive it.

The only thing I have ever fooled with that even comes remotely close involves old telephone transducers and building an ELF detector ( Extremely Low Frequency). Since my circuit was "detecting" it wasn't "driven" so to speak. I just had to use a comparator to detect minor differences in the local magnetic fields.