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Heating Help! Answered

So my new  major has me in a machine shop that is at my disposal. I have made a few shift knobs but with living in the Northeast it can get cold in the winter months.  

I want to heat the knobs, which means finding something that is...
- Small enough to fit inside a roughly 1" dia cylinder, depth minimal.
- Quickly heat the knob
- But not over heat it
- Run on a 12v standard supply
- Minimal cost

I have considered trying to find a "Heating Element" but am unable to find such in a size I need and within a price I want. Maybe a soldering Iron element?

I tried "Peltier" but they all are over-sized and debate the conflicting effects of hot and cold. However if figured out I could flip it for summer.

I debated running a resistor/other electronic component with just enough power to cause it to heat up, but am worried about it breaking.

I wanted to do a high power light bulb, but don't see that working as well as I plan.

So I am kinda at a loss...if you have a specific item you can link me to let me see it, or just let me know of an item I can use.

Discussions

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steveastrouk

7 years ago

Peltiers are PUMPS and in a low temperature ambient won't source any energy you can use. The metal clad resistor is the SIMPLEST method, turn the knob in two halves, make a screw joint around the edge and mill a pocket for the resistor inside the two halves. A good machining exercise !!

Steve

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scubarusteveastrouk

Reply 7 years ago

i was thinking of boring out a hole to the size of roughly 1" dia. thread it and then make a brass insert to thread into it, with a slot on the side for the wires. This way everything is concealed by the leather boot but still accessible.

Now for this "Metal Clad Resistor", I am assuming you are referring to "Use a 1-2Ω, 15W (or greater) resistor and power it through a 20A fuse."

I am going to guess the schematic would be....
- 12V supply
- Switch
- 20a Fuse
- Resistor in knob

Now what do you mean by "Metal Clad Resistor" as opposed to other types? My knowledge of electronics is limited, I know the very basics.

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Tool Using Animal

7 years ago

How about using a lathe to turn some nice replacement hardwood knobs, wooden knobs are much warmer to the touch than metal and most plastics.

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scubaruTool Using Animal

Reply 7 years ago

I very well could. But I love working with metal, and the weight is the real reason I am doing metal. I love a good heavy shift knob.

I do want to powder coat some of them, I have some stuff that is powder coated and when it sits in my car its not that its warmer but it does allow for some resistance to the cold.

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lemonie

7 years ago

They're too cold to the touch?
Wrap in foam perhaps and wear (fingerless)gloves

L

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scubarulemonie

Reply 7 years ago

True, would be an easy fix, but I want a challange. I want to make something that as far as I know no one else has made. Something to put my beginner skills to the test.

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steveastroukscubaru

Reply 7 years ago

Nacho has the right idea. Use ni-chrome wire (you can get it insulated) for a heater.

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scubarusteveastrouk

Reply 7 years ago

Where could I buy this stuff and how would I know what level of power to feed through it?

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NachoMahma

7 years ago

.  Use a 1-2Ω, 15W (or greater) resistor and power it through a 20A fuse.

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scubaru

7 years ago

Still Looking

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caitlinsdad

7 years ago

Maybe wrap the ribbon nichrome wire heating element/tape from a plastic bag impulse sealer around the knob. I think it uses pwm to control the heating. You can search for the ibles on this or look up electric socks. Good luck.