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Hot Water Tank Upgrade? Answered

Hi Girls n Guys, I moved about 6 months ago from a house that had combi boiler to a house that has a hot water tank and standard boiler, Over this period we are using lots of hot water due to kids baths and bits, draining the tank too quickly, so the tank is in a cupboard just off the landing and was told I can get bigger tanks, the current tank is a 1050x450 and I'm looking at a 1500x450, Question is will I need to re-enforce the floor any more than its current state! Thanks Matt

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Jack A Lopez

4 years ago

Well, if you have a cylindrical tank of water 1.0 m in height, and 0.45 m diameter, and replace it with tank 1.5 m in height, same diameter, then the weight of the new tank is greater by a factor of about 1.5.

To me that does not seem like a huge increase in weight.

Although if you want to add some wood, or steel, to the structure underneath your water tank, probably the best time to do it would be while the structure is unloaded.

I mean if you're going to be draining and replacing the water tank, then that moment in time when the old water tank is moved out, sort of provides an opportunity to do some work to the structure below where the water tank goes, and you could work in that space without having a massive water tank suspended above you.

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Matth354Jack A Lopez

Answer 4 years ago

My Thought's exactly just curious on how far to go with it :-)

Thanks

Matt

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Jack A LopezMatth354

Answer 4 years ago

I dunno. I think the answer depends on what structure is already there, underneath the existing water tank.

If I am picturing this correctly, the water tank is on a 2nd floor, and that floor is (I guess) supported by the walls of the 1st floor. Erm, you said it was on a "landing".

But what structure is inside the 1st-floor walls, holding up the second floor? Supposing the builders already put a big steel column in the wall, right under, or close to, the spot where the water tank goes, then the wall is probably strong enough already.

If it's just wooden studs, then maybe add a few more of the same. E.g. if there are now four studs, in the area directly under the water tank, then increasing that number to six, or eight studs, would make the wall 1.5x, or twice as strong, respectively, just in that one spot where strength is needed to hold up the water tank.

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Downunder35m

4 years ago

If you need a lot of water you might want to consider a more direct way of providing it.

We had a 400l water tank for the hot water until it failed and was upgraded to a 600l stainless steel model.

Although it was a double storage untit (one half says really hot, the other takes the new cold water in for pre heat) you could notice the change in water temp when using a lot of water.

The burner was basically constantly on while we had the kids in the house.

In the new house I was face with a similar problem once the hot water turned brownish, indicating the oiler will soon fail.

But this time I went for two in-line-heaters.

A gas fired on for the bath and an electric unit for the kitchen.

Concern was obviously the high power and gas demand for those units but in return your realy have the hot water within a few secends and don't waste 20 liter until you have it.

To my surprise the power consumption of these units was actually much lower than using a big water boiler for the job that is constantly heated up.

And it turned out that cranking the temp up and if required adding colder water at the outlet (especially for the bath) again saved money.

Best of all is the size, a bit bigger tha a shoe box compared to a massive block filled with water sitting around.

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Matth354Downunder35m

Answer 4 years ago

Cool, I'm in a bit of a different scenario with the same outcome.........

Hot Water Less Energy!

I have a 2 point attack in my head and I will explain,

Over the winter as above we have been running out of hot water, I would normally have approached this with a new Combi boiler as I did in the last house and rid the tank altogether but......

We have PV solar panels, to get the best return we need to use the electricity we generate rather than export it, due to me and the wife working during the day we have timers on washers / driers and slow cookers to help but still export over 80% back,

I bought a solar IBoost and hooked it up to the immersion heater and is working great and still exporting about 60% back to the grid,

BUT.. immersion heaters only heat the top half of the cylinder, the bottom half is just warm, so my solution is to replace the tank with a bigger one to help with problem 1 during the winter and a economy 7 cylinder to lower the immersion heater to heat the cylinder up more solving problem 2,

I know its a Marmite solution and I'm in favour of doing this with the excess energy I produce, if I don't have to use a none renewable source of energy I believe I shouldn't!

Not a tree hugger or anything but if I don't have to buy energy I aint,

Thanks

Matt

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steveastroukMatth354

Answer 4 years ago

Put a Gledhill thermal store in then. They are perfect here.

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Matth354steveastrouk

Answer 4 years ago

Wanted to but....

Was told it would fit in the cupboard but pipework wouldn't :-(

Thanks Matt

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steveastroukMatth354

Answer 4 years ago

Piping them is tricky. How much space have you got ? I know if I were to redo the one I did before I emigrated, I'd have piped it up such that I'd do it OUT of the cupboard, and then slide it in to terminate the pipes Or I'd use big flexis.

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Downunder35mMatth354

Answer 4 years ago

Was not aware that you already have a big solor system working for you.

:(

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steveastrouk

4 years ago

Its 50% heavier. What kind of joists is it sitting on ? Are the boards chipboard or wood ?

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Matth354steveastrouk

Answer 4 years ago

From what I can see its joists under floor boards with a chip board base laid on top of the floor boards,

Until I get in there I cant tell of there is any support between the joists,

Weight increased from 160kg to 240kg so a third increase I believe,

Thanks Matt

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steveastroukMatth354

Answer 4 years ago

If you cut it DOWN from 240kg, it would be 80/240 = 1/3rd less ;-)