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How can I convert my home gym to create energy? I own a bowflex, treadmill and row machine. Answered

I wanted to somehow use my home gym to create additional energy to aid my solar bank array(when it's not sunny). I already have a bike / generator hooked up but I wanted to convert  the other machines as well.  This way more than just the bike is topping off the bank.  Is there a way to daisy chain the machines or is it better to individually set up each generator? how would I go about doing so?

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Downunder35m

3 years ago

If you look at these cheap "push to charge" flash lights they use a simple linear mechanism that spins the "generator".
So basically you have a flat and linear "thread band" that is moving a flywheel.
As on a bike it will only move parts in the right direction, going back is running free.
The flywheel is required as otherwise you would stop the generator.
Size of flywheel and it's weight obviously depends on the quality of the push-transfer system and your strength.

For a more simple test you can actually use the mechanics from the back wheel of a push bike.
Use only the axle bit and mount a flywheel of sorts between the spoke holes.
For the sproket (or onto the sprocket) you mount a pully for a rope.
The end of the rope is connected to the roped moving your weights.
Leave enough wind up on the pulley to allow full movement of your weight ropes!
Now when you move you weights the system will spin the flywheel, the faster you move the faster it spins.
If you connect a suitable generator and belt system to the flywheel you can convert your sweat into electricity....

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Kiteman

3 years ago

As Rickharris says, you're not going to be able to run much directly.

However, assuming you're working on the principle of "every little helps", it looks like you need to connect drive belts to the bits that spin, and drive an old washing machine motor:

https://www.instructables.com/id/Stationary-Bike-Ge...

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rickharris

3 years ago

In principle yes BUT Your going to have to be VERY fit to get much out.

The averagely fit cyclist can output 3/4 hp or 559 watts for a while, realistically over a few hours your talking around 1/2 hp average. That's 373 watts, not as much as you may expect.

You will also have losses in the conversion/storage.

By all means have a go but don't anticipate power your home from your exercise.