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How to battery power a PC just like a laptop? Answered

I'm wanting to battery power a PC but don't know exactly how to assemble it, here are the parts that i plan to get.

My PC is going to draw roughly 150w, i would like it be charging and usable at the same time just like laptop

battery:

https://hobbyking.com/en_us/turnigy-high-capacity-...

PSU:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/i/182249128437?chn=ps

Charger: what charger should i get?

Don't know

Discussions

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rickharris

20 days ago

You don't say WHY you need to do this - but your highest energy density is going to be a lead acid car type battery (that's why they use them in cars)
Couple that with a suitable sized inverter and you have a semi portable power source.

HOWEVER I would approach this in a different way and build a PC suitable for battery use. having used the raspberry Pi I found it to be fairly easy with LOTS of support.
https://www.instructables.com/howto/PI+PC/

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Downunder35m

20 days ago

Ever considered an embedded system?

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MR_instruct

20 days ago

How long do you need to run off a battery ? A good UPS is still probably your best solution, since then you do not need to worry about the charging and changeover from AC power to battery.

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OTKZukiMR_instruct

Reply 20 days ago

only for 1-2hrs and 150w is 100% but probably won't be hitting it with 100% load all the time

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Downunder35m

20 days ago

You have several problems with an approach like this.
Firstly the battery needs to be of suffient size and power.
Secondly the input voltage of the PSU needs to be able to cope with the depleting battery voltage.
You say about 150W shall be used, that means on just 12V alone it would equal to around 13amps if you inlcude the losses.
Sure, your battery might be able to provide about 20amps - but for how long until it runs too low??
An UPS with a massive sized battery might be able o give a 150W PC about 30 minutes until it goes off.
And those have batteries in the 40 to 60AH range and often by the double.

To work effiently your PSU need a high input voltage of around 19V if my quick read was correct.
That means you should use at least 2 battery packs, prefable a few more though.
Then add a good step down converter that provides the stable input for your PSU.
It should also shut off in case the battery voltage drops too much.
In terms of chargin while using you will notice that this approach is not really simple either.
Any charger will cause the voltage to fluctuate and might also cause signicant ripple on the DC.
To actually charge the battery while the battery runs the PC the charger needs to output what is needed to charge plus what is needed to run the PC.
And still the best option for this is to power the PC independently from the batteries.
Means the "charger" would have two outputs and when plugged in cut the PC connection to the batteries.

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MR_instruct

20 days ago

Your approach will probably now work, since a Computer ATX power supply has multiple voltages ( google the ATX specs ) . A better approach might be to use a standard 12 V battery with charger that is connected to a 12 inverter of at least 150 W.

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OTKZukiMR_instruct

Reply 20 days ago

yeah i did think about getting a DC to AC inverter and there's quite a few vids on doing that , making an AC power bank and i actually might do that but what charger do i look for?

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OTKZukiMR_instruct

Reply 20 days ago

all the UPS i have seen have had a really bad battery life

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MR_instruct

20 days ago

Update. You can probably use the power supply, but the input says :
Master/slave input:


  • 16V to 24V, typical 19V regulated, min=1A, max=25A (load dependent). and your battery does not meet minimum requirements. Also you need to check battery size and whether it can supply the needed current. How long do you expect the battery to last ? Why not just buy a UPS ( uninterruptable power supply ) , since it may be cheaper.