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I am writing the story for a game. Can anyone help with the game making itself? Answered

I've written a pretty long story that I am no where near done with and I need a game for it. I have the main characters, sort of how it ends, what kind of game, what the map will look like, some missions, and more.

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bwrussell

2 years ago

It's probably good you're not done with the story if you really want it to be a game. The truth of how game design works best is that you really need to make the game first then write the story. Your focus should be the game now.

Out of curiosity what's the elevator pitch for the game/story?

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bwrussellDurant810

Answer 2 years ago

An elevator pitch is a real short (the idea being you have to be able to give it in the time it takes to ride an elevator a few floors) pitch about your idea that should let people know what it's all about and why they should care/want to get involved.

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Durant810bwrussell

Answer 2 years ago

well can you help me? i planned on splitting it all 50/50

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bwrussellDurant810

Answer 2 years ago

You still haven't given any sort of synopsis or pitch. If youre going to want people to work at-risk then you'll need to convince them your project is worthy of their time and that it's feasible.

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Durant810bwrussell

Answer 2 years ago

well i don't want to give my ideas away so i need an offer to help before i say anything

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bwrussellDurant810

Answer 2 years ago

Offering to help doesn't guarantee a person won't just "take" your ideas and no one is signing a NDA or contract with no information from an unproven stranger.

Let's start small. What kind of game is it. What's your genre and basic mechanics set?

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Durant810bwrussell

Answer 2 years ago

its an apocalypse rpg with parkour. I want it to have everything my favorite games DIDN'T have.

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bwrussellDurant810

Answer 2 years ago

So sort of Dying Light meets Fallout?

I'm confused as to why having features that weren't in your favorite games would be a good thing. It stands to reason that it was the things that WHERE in those games that made them your favorites, not what wasn't. You'll have to be more specific about what sort of mechanics you're talking about.

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Durant810bwrussell

Answer 2 years ago

Haven't you ever been playing a game and said "I wish i could..." and then say something you wish was in he game?

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bwrussellDurant810

Answer 2 years ago

Of course, but not typically in my favorite games. If I felt something was missing it probably wouldn't be a favorite. You also have to realize that the devs of those games probably considered the feature or mechanic you want but decided against it for some reason and to think that as a first time dev you're going to do what they did plus a bunch of extra stuff is just unrealistic.

I'd highly recommend checking out the Extra Credits channel on YouTube. They have a lot of videos, written by a developer, about the ins and outs of game development. Particularly take a look at their video on Minimal Viable Products.

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Durant810bwrussell

Answer 2 years ago

well i still like the games i just always think of ways for them to improve

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bwrussellDurant810

Answer 2 years ago

That's fair but my point is that you're aiming way too high for your first project. Everyone's first attempt, and 2nd and 3rd too probably, usually aren't great. It's just part of learning and the skill of being able to fail early and fast but keep moving forward is probably the number one skill necessary for a new dev to succeed. This means your pet/passion project probably isn't the best choice for your first few go around.

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bwrussellDurant810

Answer 2 years ago

Check out that channel I mentioned, Extra Credits, particularly their developer focused playlist. You start the same way you start learning anything. Make something small and get it in front of people's eyes if you can. It can be a very simple piece of something bigger you're working towards or stand entirely on its own.

Just keep making small little things. Get feedback. Once you've got the basics under control start to focus one by one on building up specific skills. Make a prototype that has awesome movement and controls but is bare bones in every other aspect. Make another with a progression system or a loot system. Start putting things together, getting more and more complex. Keep reaching out for feedback and eventually when you think you're ready, for a few people to help turn your pet project into a reality.

There's a fine line between jumping in too soon and holding out to start. Start to soon and you'll run into walls you can't pass and progress will be slow enough to break your motivation. Wait too long and the version of your project in your head will be so perfect you'll be scared of falling short and may never start or at least will never meet your overly polished expectations.

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Durant810bwrussell

Answer 2 years ago

well do u have any experience? because the whole reason i posted this was to see if someone could make the game for me or suggest a software or teach me first hand.

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bwrussellDurant810

Answer 2 years ago

And everything I'm saying to you is trying to explain that no one is going to just take on a project like that. Especially when you say you'll spilt 50-50 but can't/won't do any of the actual work.

Most every major 3D game engine is free to use (with companies taking compensation on sales) these days, Unity, Source Engine, Unreal, or Amazon Lumberyard (possibly Cryengine too). When you're starting out something simpler like Construct 2 or GameMaker: Studio is probably more appropriate. Even something like RPGMaker can help you learn something like balance.

Honestly it doesn't matter what you do as long as you just start. Even developing some sort of table top game can teach you a lot about putting together game systems.

And for the final time: go check out the YouTube channel Extra Credits, they have a ton of videos for people just like you.

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rickharris

2 years ago

Forum subject really - It will get you more help and interest.

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Durant810rickharris

Answer 2 years ago

huh? sorry I'm new to instructables so youll have to dumb things down for me a bit

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Durant810rickharris

Answer 2 years ago

1. Don't call my ideas nothing.

2. What subject area do you suggest i put it in?

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Yonatan24Durant810

Answer 2 years ago

He isn't calling your ideas nothing. He meant that you didn't write anything about paying someone to do that for you.

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rickharrisDurant810

Answer 2 years ago

I didn't call your ideas nothing - I was taking about payment for their time and skill.

I guess wanted in the market place.