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Ipod flash drive Answered

Hey I was looking for a broken ipod mini the other day so I could get a new case for mine, and I noticed that many of them still have working hard drives. That's when it hit me. I was thinking, why let all that space go to waste, when you pay $80 at the store for just a 2 gig flash drive. Would it be possible to make a flash drive from the hard drive in the ipod? At first I was just going to wire the drive to a USB port, but I'm thinking that may not work. Does anybody out there know more about how flash drives work? I think I have a good idea, now I'm counting on your imput!

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Ducky_2010

11 years ago

Thanks for the feedback but I don't think you guys quite understand what I want to do. I know the ipods can be used as a flash drive, but I'm not wanting to keep the whole thing intact. I was going to salvage the case from an ipod mini with a broken motherboard or something for the one I already have, and it occured to me that throwing out 4-6 gigs of storage space was a waste. I was wanting to pretty much wire the drive directly to a usb cord, and put the unit into a mint tin or something for protection. I just am not sure if it will work. I'll probly try it anyway just for the fun of it.

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westfwDucky_2010

Reply 11 years ago

Note that it's only the mini that has the CF-sized hard drive. The nanos have individual flash chips soldered on the board. Naked iPod nano Guts. and iPod mini Guts.

Unfortunately, I expect that the hard drive would be one of the more delicate and most likely to have failed components in a mini, so your hit-rate in trying to rescue CF drives from (cheap) broken iPods might not be very good.

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LasVegaswestfw

Reply 11 years ago

You forget the full sized iPod of every generation. They all have CF sized hard drives. They're also surprisingly rugged for those 1.5" mechanisms. I've dropped my mini at least a dozen times running and not, without lose. Of course... Every time my heart just about stops...

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westfwLasVegas

Reply 11 years ago

The CF-sized disk drives are 1 inch drives. The drives used in the full-sized iPods are 1.8inch (PCMCIA sized)

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trebuchet03Ducky_2010

Reply 11 years ago

Ditto what Vegas said -- that's why I posted links on how to remove and places where salvaging has worked well ;)

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LasVegasDucky_2010

Reply 11 years ago

I did understand. And I explained that the drive used in the iPod is a Compact Flash (CF) interface. It will not interface directly into your USB port, but can be adapted with a USB CF Reader.

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zachninme

11 years ago

$80 is expensive for a flash drive. A 2GB SD card can be ~$50 :-)

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LasVegaszachninme

Reply 11 years ago

I just purchased a 2GB SD for under $30 and that was with a USB Reader! :)

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zachninmeLasVegas

Reply 11 years ago

See! (I guessed $50 because I didn't want to go under :-D)

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trebuchet03

11 years ago

I'm pretty sure that the iPod mini uses a Hitachi micro drive and not a flash drive. It uses the same ATA interface as CF, but it is less reliable simple due to moving parts.

In any case, the same drive is used in the Nomad Muvo 4GB -- and it doesn't have the 3 partition formatting like apple's iPod. Comparatively, salvaging micro drive is MUCH cheaper than buying it new ;)


This guy had success with his Cannon 10D and the Muvo drive:
http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1019&message=7276581

He also put a 1GB flash drive in his Muvo and it worked (with firmware updates).

This person replaced his micro drive with an 8GB flash drive: http://www.entrenched.org/forum/showthread.php?t=1393
and http://homepage.mac.com/jason.parry/mini8gb.html


Here is how to take it apart ;) http://www.ipodbattery.com/ipodminiinstall.html


I haven't done any research, but the iPod nano is solid state ;)

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LasVegas

11 years ago

Your iPod is already a flash drive as well. If it doesn't already mount when you plug it in, you can turn on that feature from iTunes. Depending on which iPod you have, you may have a hard drive or RAM. So far, the hard drives have been of the CF (Compact Flash) format. These could be interfaced into your computer with an appropriate reader, but could not be connected directly into any USB port.