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LED Throwies Picture Answered

So I was in Maplin Electronics yesterday, looking or a specific transistor I needed. I was just browsing the shelves, and found so called "Goodie Bags" of LEDs. Imagine the shock then, when I saw the picture on the front. It was the same picture as is on the original LED throwie instructable! Anyone have any ideas about this? Was permission given to use it? Does it violate the terms of use of instructables?

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Well, if you take a look at the LED throwies Instructable, its license says Public domain. That means that people can do what they want with the pictures and and the invention.

Well technically, the Throwie is a part of the Graffiti Research Lab, not a part of Instructables. It just so happened that they put up their Instructable here, and may be the most popular one here. So, technically, if my knowledge is right, Instructables wouldn't be the true owner of the image.

Would that mean though, that the company that packages the LED's is infringing a possible copyright by using the image?

Technically they are infringing on copyright if Graffiti Labs did not give them consent.

Well, if you take a look at the LED throwies Instructable, its license says Public domain. That means that people can do what they want with the pictures and and the invention.

Yeah, I saw that to in a shop. And the LEDs in the bag isn't the same as the ones used to make throwies.

led_mix_spot.jpgdht.jpg

LED goodie bags? How much for how many?

unclecytheledguy.com got hundreds fm him at reasonable prices. slow boat shipping saves green, too. good luck. lite the world.

I think around £2.50 for 80. Various colours, sizes etc..

Why is it that this site (or possibly the Wiki formatting) hates the pound sign?

Maybe it will stop doing it when the dollar gets stronger against sterling?

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gmoon

10 years ago

You bring up an interesting point, but I've been thinking just the opposite direction...

I'm a commercial photographer by trade, and hundreds of instructables use images just, well, taken from other websites. No attribution, no credit, and probably without realization that this constitutes stealing.

It's practically impossible to police this kind of thing. And the vast majority of 'product' photographs, are likely copyrighted, but companies are generally pleased to see them show up randomly on other sites (PR for free.)

However, I have seen more personal 'artsy' images here, and stock images, too. The copyright holders wouldn't be amused.

This must be a cultural thing. If it's on the web (and I'm smart enough to copy and paste), then it's free--creative / intellectual property rights be damned.

The only real way would be to watermark everything, but that's not possible because it can ruin the images or be simply edited out. You could "invest" in an encrypted watermark that embeds itself in the image, but than that doesn't show in print. The last line of your comment really rings true. It does seem as though that is the case nowadays.

Yes, it's endemic to the web, and not something I expect instrucables to solve (or even address, if they can possibly avoid it.) Given the way companies (sony) have screwed up DRM, etc., I'm sympathetic to those who 'stick it to the man.' But photographic / artistic images are often owned by an individual. (Frankly, it doesn't concern me directly, as I mostly do public relations work, and clients get liberal distribution rights. Just commenting on the cluelessness of many people.)