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Looking for a Waveform Generator? Answered

I'm doing a science fair project that requires a curve tracer, and after reading around online, I found that an oscilloscope can be used with a waveform generator as a curve tracer. I already have an oscilloscope and now I just need the function generator. Does anyone know of a decent but inexpensive waveform generator with a voltage output maximum of somewhere around 6-10 volts or more?

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steveastrouk

4 years ago

Take a look at some of the projects here on the right.

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danielemursteveastrouk

Answer 4 years ago

I've looked through those and other instructables, but most either have voltage or frequency restrictions which won't work for my needs.

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steveastroukdanielemur

Answer 4 years ago

Since you didn't post your restrictions.....

I don't think, unless you want gigahertz and megavolts that you'd have much difficulty making one of the projects do what you want.

Now define it properly. WHAT waveforms ? Do you need an AWG, or just a sine, square or triangle wave ?

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danielemursteveastrouk

Answer 4 years ago

I actually did state in the description that I need a function generator with a maximum voltage of at least somewhere around 6-10 volts. The problem is that many of them have a maximum of 3.3 volts, and while I could potentially amplify the signal, that would require extra parts and time. I did forget to mention in the question that I need a sine wave generator.

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steveastroukdanielemur

Answer 4 years ago

You didn't mention frequency or waveform.

This project gives something like +/- 8V out.

https://www.instructables.com/id/Arbitrary-waveform...

And Ebay sell them

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/New-DDS-Function-Signal-Generator-Module-Sine-Square-Sawtooth-Triangle-Wave-/281225637298?pt=UK_BOI_Electrical_Test_Measurement_Equipment_ET&hash=item417a5aadb2

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danielemursteveastrouk

Answer 4 years ago

Oh, I saw that and read in the first step that it generates waves between 0 and 0.2 volts but missed where it states that that is the voltage before amplification. This might work.