308Views21Replies

Author Options:

MP3 to Cassette Tape Answered

Would like hook up my laptop to a cassette recorder/stereo so that i can make mix tapes from MP3's. My brother's friend did it years ago, but can't remember how he did it for the life of me. Any suggestions on certain cables I need or any other information. Much appreciated.

Discussions

0
None
lemonie

11 years ago

I want to do the reverse, but my only tape-deck has stopped functioning properly. Being quite advanced I don't know what the problem is or how to fix it.... L

0
None
gyromildlemonie

Reply 11 years ago

It could be mechanical or electrical/electronic problems..For mechanical, the rubber band is the most common source of problem (thanks NM).It could fall off the motor wheel or snapped. Plus you can clean the wheels from all entangled fibres, and give them small squirt of WD-40 (be sure to cover the read head, before you do so). Btw, can you still listen to the radio?

0
None
lemoniegyromild

Reply 11 years ago

No, it's more than that. The deck is touch-button with servos, clicks, clunks and interlocks. It just won't play, like one of the microswitches or parts of the mechanism is in the wrong position, rather than something being broken. L It's a Technics SA-K6L

0
None
lemonieNachoMahma

Reply 11 years ago

Yea it's got a radio receiver in it too, and I coudn't find anything on the internet either. The thing comes with a turntable, so it's a fairly compact system, not really designed to be part of anything larger, but with the option. And one of the stereo channels is dodgy too. L

0
None
NachoMahmalemonie

Reply 11 years ago

. If dodgy means it "crackles" when you adjust the volume, it's probably the volume pot. Get some contact cleaner with a straw on the spray nozzle and spray the Hell out of while you move the knob back and forth. With the stereo off, of course. . I like to give them a shot of WD-40, after cleaning, but some ppl say that will attract dust. I've never had a problem.

0
None
lemonieNachoMahma

Reply 11 years ago

No, it means it drops out almost completely. If you spend 10 mins fiddling with the balance you can get it right if you're lucky (I gave up and switched to the PC a long time ago) L

0
None
LasVegaslemonie

Reply 11 years ago

Sounds like it could use a complete Cap-Kit replacement. Probably old enough too merit it.

0
None
lemonieLasVegas

Reply 11 years ago

What exactly would I need to replace? Capacitors somewhere in the amplifier area? L

0
None
LasVegaslemonie

Reply 11 years ago

A "cap-kit" is the replacement of every electrolytic capacitor (or in the case of very-very old radios oil-filled caps) in the unit. After 20-30 years, they start to dry out. Most other components should last almost forever if not damaged from shorted caps.

0
None
lemonieLasVegas

Reply 11 years ago

Well, I have plenty out of a newer stereo. I didn't know what I was going to do with 'em, but now I have an idea... L

0
None
NachoMahmalemonie

Reply 11 years ago

. Be careful, some of the caps can bite you if they still have a charge. . The quality of the caps will make a big difference in the sound - scrounge the best caps you can find. Although, if this is one of those all-in-one units, it's probably not "audiophile" quality to start with. . If it is a high quality unit, it may be worth spending the money on a matched set of caps - as LV said, most everything else will last a long time.

0
None
lemonieNachoMahma

Reply 11 years ago

Yes, but I only need really need the tape-deck. I'd like the amp to work, but I could just buy a new one. The cap's I have will be of srandard/average quality, and in the amp area none of 'em are going to hold much charge.

(Though I do have some big ones somewhere...)

L

0
None
NachoMahmalemonie

Reply 11 years ago

. Is the transport working? If so, you should be able to find the signal cables that go to the pre-amp and feed those signals to another receiver (just using the current receiver to power the transport). Watch for ground loops. . If the transport is not working, finding replacement parts might be a problem. But you can find just about anything on eBay.

0
None
lemonieNachoMahma

Reply 11 years ago

Yes, I could replace it... But I think this all started with mp3 to tape - why? That's a step in the wrong direction surely? L

0
None
NachoMahmalemonie

Reply 11 years ago

. From a sound quality point, it makes no sense at all. But maybe the person has a car that only has a cassette deck - like the '95 Chevy Lumina I drive. Or maybe they just like the sound of tape hiss. heehee

0
None
lemonieNachoMahma

Reply 11 years ago

(Hiss: ha ha) Mmm, people I know have iPod FM transmitters and stereo-jack to tape-deck adaptors... L

0
None
NachoMahmalemonie

Reply 11 years ago

. First things I'd check are any "rubber bands" that may have fallen off or any rubber drive wheels that have gotten hard.

0
None
Kiteman

11 years ago

If you're serious enough to spend proper money, and plan on doing it a lot, why not install this in your computer?

If you're looking for a software / line-in solution, this lady seems to have solved it.

0
None
NachoMahma

11 years ago

. I think all you will need is a cable from your sound card to the recorder. You can use the headphone jack, but that will require a cable with a dropping resistor (not that big of a deal, readily available). Just make sure you get the right plugs on the cable. Should be available at just about any electronics store or department (Radio Shack, WalMart, &c).

0
None
LasVegas

11 years ago

All you need is an audio patch cable. Connect it from the audio out of your computer or MP3 player to the mic input of the cassette recorder. If the recorder has a line level indicator, adjust your source so the needle spikes just below the red line.