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MY SONY HOME THEATRE RECIEVER DISPLAYS PROTECT WHAT DOES IT MEAN ? Answered

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I have Bose Acoustimass speakers and they pass through the subwoofer where the subwoofer would terminate an error before it reaches my receiver so I know it's not my speakers or wires. Also, all the wires were securely tight. Our house does not receive a clean current. Electricity seems to come to our house with spikes and drops. I know this because my computer is on a voltage regulator. That is what is tripping the switch in my ES Receiver. I bought a CyberPower UPS voltage regulator for under $100 and no more protection error! I am so happy I did not take my unit in for servicing or throw it away since the ES Series is not cheap!

Plus it has the extra benefit if you are watching tv or playing tunes when the power goes out, it keeps playing with the battery back up. It is best to shut it all down at that point since the battery can only last for a short amount of time depending on how much you have on the battery side. There are plugs too without battery back up and they do support voltage regulation as well.
I bought the CyberPower System AVRG750U. Good luck and feel free to message me with questions. BTW, Sony was no help in determining the cause. Their solution was to pay to get it fixed (nothing wrong with it) buy a new one!

you are a great fault finder ,l like your suggestions,.

Its trying to make you take your caps lock button off ?

Then learn to type with the shift key down except when you want a cap, it is rather annoying in all caps. I'm just saying.

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iceng

5 years ago

OUCH

Usually it has to do with a blown fuse if I remember correctly.

Oh, and the caps lock button is third button up from the bottom row, and on the very left on most U.S and international keyboards. it usually has a little light in it to tell you if it is on. Try hitting that button, just once, and see what it does :D

Something tripped the receiver into protection mode (kind of like a circuit breaker) to prevent damage. You'll need to try and figure out what caused it. It could be from a power issue, an internal issue, an overheating issue or even a bad speaker wire. If you've added or changed anything, you may want to investigate there first; but if everything has been the same for some time, I would start with the wiring. Pull out the receiver and the speaker wires. Cut new clean ends on the wires, strip the insulation and neatly twist the ends for the receiver (and do a good visual inspection to see if there isn't a small broken piece of wire stuck in the receiver). Do the same thing at the speakers. If that doesn't work, consider replacing the wiring (as it could have a break somewhere inside).

For an overheating issue, ensure that its not covered in dust and locked up tight in a cabinet. (It needs to get some air). In this instance, the receiver will go in protection mode after some time of use (because its getting too hot). This can also happen if its too dusty on the inside, so if you're careful, you can open it up and clean it with a can of compressed air.

To reset it, you'll need to unplug it (for 2 hours or more).

If none of those things solve the problem, then it may need a trip to the repair shop, or find a repair manual online if you are electronically inclined. (Or convert it into a boat anchor or a large paper weight). Quite often the repair costs are more than buying a new one.