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Motorcycle regulator wire burning Answered

I have a xj600 pre div, been stood for few months, I started her up other day and after ten mins ticking over I noticed the wires coming from/to the regulator/rectifier started to burn....What could be the causes??? And what can I do To fix please... Thanks....

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Yonatan24

7 weeks ago

If it's burning from the inside, the wires are heating up because the connector isn't rated for that current. If it's burning from the outside it's too close to a heat source. Probably a mix of both?

BTW I'm looking a a high current connector for a project too, and if anyone you help that would be great. 10-15A max current.

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petercdYonatan24

Reply 7 weeks ago

Try R/C connectors like either the Deans or XT60 variety, they range in sizes from 10A to 60A.

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Yonatan24petercd

Reply 7 weeks ago

I tried the XT-60s a few years ago but they were impossible to solder to! I recently tried deans connectors but they were also impossible to solder too because the plastic would melt almost immediately, and the small brass pins/contacts would shift around inside the connector, ruining it. Argh!

Perhaps it's junk eBay stuff. Have you had any success soldering to them?

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petercdYonatan24

Reply 7 weeks ago

Didnt have the problems you seem to have encountered.
I bought mine at a RC hobby shop so they were most likely the good quality nylon ones.

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Yonatan24Yonatan24

Reply 7 weeks ago

There might also be a problem with the contacts, where it keep connecting and diconnecting because of the vibrations, causing the contact to spark and generate more heat.

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Downunder35mYonatan24

Reply 7 weeks ago

If size is no problem then look at the connectors used for caravans, not sure how they are called in the US, we call then Anderson plugs.
The bigger ones are rated for 60A I think.
Never had any problem with them, although I keep them clean and every now and then give them a spray of corrosion protection.
But then again I gues you are not going through mud holes and river crossings like I do LOL
If you require even higher standards then look at industrial 2 or 3 phase power connectors.
The big brothers and sisters of our wall plugs and outlets.
No real limit in current but even the small ones are quite big due to lockable features and cable clamps.

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Yonatan24Downunder35m

Reply 7 weeks ago

Yup, I know what you're talking about, but those are way overkill, I just need connectors to power my SpectrumLED lamp and another LED panel at 15 amps, regular bullet connectors turn into hot plastic glue guns from the heat ;)

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Toga_Dan

7 weeks ago

After cleaning the corrosion + dirt, tighten the springiness of the clip so it grabs on. Then apply dielectric grease before reassembling.

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Downunder35m

7 weeks ago

Nice pic!
Would love to see other including them with their problems - a pic says more than thausand words...

Your problem is quite simple: corrosion ;)
The contacts on both ends corroded and when they needed to provide lots of juice the resistance caused the overheating.
There is a good chance the wires on the connector you hold are affected too.

Here is what I did to my old XR500 back when I was still young:
Use a cut to size popstickle stick or similar to glue some sandpaper on it.
Prepare a good handful with grits of 400 or slightly below and some with really fine grit in the 600 to 1000 region.
Make sure the cut sticks fit to reach the terminals on your regulator.
Once the glue is dried clean the contacts from all signs of corrosion.
Use compressed air to clean the dust out.
If you don't have air: Use a straw ;)
The connector is best to be replaced.
You can use spade connectors directly on the wires, preferably the insulated types but a replacement is far better.
If the actual wires appear black or have greenish residue on them it means the copper is oxidised.
This will prevent proper contacts on the new connector and result in overheating at the wires.
If you have then solder with an acid core will be able to make them shiny again - do not try standard rosing core solder on oxidised copper wires!
Another trick that works fine is to use "Shining powder" from your Indian grocery store.
It removes the oxidation quickly and after a cleanup with alcohol sodering is easy with standard rosin core.
Those liquid cleaners for brass and silver can work too but stink like hell and really require you to clean all residue off - not easy if it goes under the insulation.
Soldering the wires will prevent further oxidation and allows for a better crimping of the connectors.

If your connector is as badly placed as mine was then it is prone to keep water inside.
Once your repairs are done to your satisfaction use acrylis sealant - not silicone based sealant!
Cover the entire connection are up to the wires to create a watertight seal.
If you ever need to get there again acrylic sealant can just be peeled off and wont't affect the surfaces in the negative way silicone does - it would make soldering next to impossible.
Good luck and let us know how the fix worked out!