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Nuclear Reactors and Batteries Answered

Hydrogen fusion is a promising source of energy. They have made fusion reactors already. Though they aren't going to supply our energy needs because they consume more energy than the make. Fission reactors have been already made and are good at making energy. Unfortunately they have dangerous radioactive byproducts and wastes. Please post anything you want as long as it has something to do with nuclear reactors.

Discussions

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salazam

6 years ago

I thought fusion created more energy, it just requires insane amounts of heat. Like in the sun. If only there was a way to harness THAT energy...

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Masterdudesalazam

Reply 6 years ago

I've read that some people think thermonuclear reactions could be carried out at lower temperatures (ahem "cold fusion") but it seems that their claims have not been definitely proved or disprove and are generally considered in the category as "anti-gravity" devices. If only cold fusion worke it would be awesome. In essence, it's a jar with water and metal electrode (well, it may be slightly more complicated then that...).

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Lithium Rain

9 years ago

I live fairly close to a renowned research facility. I suppose I'm dead meat if it ever goes kablooey.

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kelseymhLithium Rain

Reply 9 years ago

The big national labs don't generally go kablooey. The ones with weapons programs just contaminate the ground water (Brookhaven's tritium, Hanford's various nasties, Pantex's beryllium). The "pure science" ones (Fermilab, SLAC, NHMFL) are usually more concerned about the local community. Not that I'm biased or anything...

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Lithium Rainkelseymh

Reply 9 years ago

This one dump ed/s mercury into the local river. :-\ Hopefully they've cleaned up their act.

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Lithium Rainkelseymh

Reply 9 years ago

>Forehead wrinkles in confusion< Ummm...Рыба!

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kelseymhLithium Rain

Reply 9 years ago

I asked Google to translate "you're welcome", then cut and pasted. Did I end up with the "you're" part by mistake? Oh, well.

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Lithium Rainkelseymh

Reply 9 years ago

No, I think it means "can", as in "can do". Unless I'm wrong. Which, you know, I could be.

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kelseymh

9 years ago

New Scientist is reporting on a version of a "radioactive solar cell", which collects beta-decay electrons directly for current.

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kelseymh

9 years ago

Do natural reactors count? The Oklo site in Gabon (West Africa) is a rock formation containing the decay products of a "standard" U-235 water-moderated reactor.

The "reactor" was formed about 1.5 billion years ago when natural uranium-containing minerals were concentrated, presumably by migrating through ground water. At that time, the fraction of U-235 in natural uranium was higher (since not as much had decayed), high enough to be usable as fissionable material.

The ground water itself acted as the neutron moderator, permitting a self-sustaining chain reaction to run intermittently for a few hundred thousand years.

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Masterdudekelseymh

Reply 9 years ago

Yeah. I think I read about this on the Discover Magazine web site.

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kelseymhWeissensteinburg

Reply 9 years ago

I had just read the article myself before seeing bumpus's comment. Where did you read about them?

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Weissensteinburgkelseymh

Reply 9 years ago

I have no idea =] I just remembered an article about the bath-tub size reactors that would just require monthly service, and that after like five years, it would produce a softball sized amount of waste.

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bumpus

9 years ago

Heh, there are two pretty close to me. :P

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KentsOkay

9 years ago

... Right there with yah?