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Old VCR Case Answered

I have an old VCR, and I took it apart and scavenged for useful parts. I sold a couple, and threw out the rest. I kept the empty case in case I though of something to do with it, but so far I've had no ideas. I still kept the plugs and other parts from the inside which you can see from the outside. If anybody has an idea for what to do with it that would be great. Thanks in advance.

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gmoon

7 years ago

The emf shield (sheet steel) from an old VCR became an amplifier chassis in one of my builds...

Once I used a small metal box for the case around a digital voice recorder (way back when you could get the chip from RS, and build it from the ground up), and I picked up quite a few AM radio stations on it from the area  LOL   It wasn't grounded I presume.    

It's recorder AND it's a radio. Two projects in one ;-)

Sadly it recorded the radio almost as loud as my voice....I had to recase it in plastic and rearrange the position of some of the componants in order to get it to quit. But yeah, it gave me an early intro into radio receiving :-)

So just changing the lead dress fixed it? Cool.

It's a common problem with audio circuits... without a tuning circuit, it's kinda amazing you don't just hear a jumble of 30 radio stations at once...

Well, without a half decent antenna (the mains line is GREAT for that LOL), you normally only pick up the closest and strongest stations. Even the little "receivers" I am building on purpose; to add to my las ible, can barely pick up anything that isn't overpowering and quite close.

I didn't see your diode crystal set. That takes me back!

Yep, proximity counts, although I've had builds where the station changes if you move things around.

Bought one of those radio-on-a-chip things for $2 a couple years ago, just to play with. Darn thing didn't work as well as some of the accidental radios ;-)

:-) I have an OLD 'radio in a chip" left (looked like a 2N2222 transister, metal can), that was from quite awhile ago. I couldn't find someone to buy it off of, but some old timer electronics engineers that read and published in Electronics Now, and Popular Electronics years ago, sent me a hand full. I burnt up one or two by hitchin them up backwards and got one to work, but yeah, it wasn't anything to write home about.

In my next "part" of the series on radio receiving, I will be showing how to "make" a diode (detector) out of a few different household items....some things they did in the army during the second world war, etc. to occupy some of their time.  I don't know if anyone is "clamouring" to see this, but I do have one person interesting in the diode thing :-)

Oh that reminds me,  EVERY time I built an amplifier from scratch, I ended up with a radio.  I didn't realize it at the time, but we had a station down town......less then 1/4 mile away.......yep,  that was an easy one to pick up in the day  ;-)  

Add me to the clamor. Like a lotta kids in the 60's I made my own germanium diode crystal set. And somehow I acquired one with a "whisker"-type detector. I'd enjoy seeing how to fab a detector from scratch.

Also, I eventually learned--at least with the types of amps I usually muck with-- that it's pretty easy to block radio reception. Adding a "blocker" resistor works in conjunction with the "input capacitance" of the first stage components to form a low-pass filter. If the first active component has a high input impedance (like a tube), adding resistance in series with the input doesn't attenuate the signal very much...

Yes, I don't remember where my "crystal set" came from either; but I do remember it quite clearly.....I never got it to work quite as well as they said it should, but then it was my very first "electronics" intro, and I didn't understand many things, one being the need for an antenna wire that stretched out nearly the length of our back yard, and another, why the slider bar (a tuner made of a piece of metal screwed into a base so it could rotate) needed to make contact with coil wires. I mean, the instructions said to lightly sand the path of the tuner bar on the coil, but didn't explain why. Still, I eventually learned a lot from that set. It had a real piece of galena in it for the crystal "cat's whisker" detector.
Later, I got a mineral set from someone and it had a piece of galena in it about one inch square.  Boy did I have fun with that bit of rock :-)

It's just an empty box - no ejector mechanism.

Too bad, because it is a brilliant I'ble.
Couldn't you use the ejector mechanism of the toaster?

I guess you could simply mount the toaster sideways in the case, but you'd have to cut an extra slot in the side of the case for the toaster's slider, and you'd have to leave the little door off the case as well, otherwise the toast would jam up behind it and catch fire.

Keep it for future projects you might want to do.

Fill the case with concrete and scrap metal.

Place it on your front step with a hidden webcam pointing at it.

Add a sign that says "For Sale, $200, please post cash through mail box."

Post the video of thieves giving themselves a hernia on MetaCafe or Vimeo, earn $$$

You could use the case as a computer mod, I doubt if any thief broke in they would steal a VCR instead of a computer LOL.