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Pentium 4 CPU hitting 75+ Degrees C (167 Degrees F) Answered

Hi It's the good old Aussie summer and my computer doesn't like it one bit. Does anyone think a Pentium 4 CPU getting up to 75+ Degrees C (167 Degrees F) is a bit hot? The case only has only one case fan (in the power supply) Any suggestions to get it to run cooler? More fans? Water cooling?

Discussions

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yourcat

9 years ago

That's bad. I would add another fan, maybe in the side of the case right over the CPU?

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thermoelectricyourcat

Reply 9 years ago

Yeah, It's just that there is no place in the side of the case to do anything.........

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guyfrom7up

9 years ago

I don't know, but my computer runs very hot (my room has never been cold this winter, I'm actually sweating a bit, someitmes I have to open a window). One time when I was cleaning the heat sink I pulled out soooo much dust it was disgusting. Then I forgot to plug the cpu fan back in and started running the computer. Luckily after a while it shut down due to the thermal sensors. When I went to investigate the problem I burned my left hand on the heatsink. Owy

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westfwguyfrom7up

Reply 9 years ago

I'm with "guy" - the first thing to do is check to make sure that your current CPU fan/heatsink isn't clogged with dust!

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thermoelectricwestfw

Reply 9 years ago

Yeah, If I take the heatsink assembly off, does that mean I need to replace the heat transferring compound?

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Plasmanathermoelectric

Reply 9 years ago

You don't have to, but the CPU will be cooler if you replace the compound.

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westfwthermoelectric

Reply 9 years ago

To some extent, it'll depend on how much goop is still there, and what sort of shape it's in. On some heatsinks I've cleaned, there has been extra goop that was still plenty goopy (probably whoever had put it on originally had used too much), so I just scooped some up from "beside" the chip where is wasn't doing any good anyway, and put it back on top before replacing the heatsink. If there's very little, or if it's all dried up, you'll need to find new goop.

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Plasmanawestfw

Reply 9 years ago

I have come across heatsinks with excess goop, but, very often it is covered in dust, so I have to replace it...

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thermoelectricguyfrom7up

Reply 9 years ago

Oh, wow. I've found a bit of dust in this PC, that I'll be cleaning today.

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11010010110

9 years ago

clean everythong - heatsink fans and power supply check the voltages - over voltage especially on 5 and 3.3 V) makes other components in the computer overheat and the air inside the computer becomes hotter. hot air cools the cpu less replace the thermal thing between the cpu and heatsink if it hardened or became cracky. clean well the cpu and cooler before applying the new material. you can use a drop of synthetic engine oil and wipe it all over the cpu top area instead of the intended cooling material clean the software on the computer. background processes use the cpu and make it heat more (in some computer you can literally hear when the cpu works hard. it takes more power and the fan speed changes due to slightly reduced voltage) if you install a second fan below the power supply - try both directions. for better cooling of the entire computer (and not just cpu) it should blow in the same direction as the power supply fan you may want to leave the computer case open. i do on most my computers

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Plasmana11010010110

Reply 9 years ago

A little spelling error at the top of your comment...

clean everythong - heatsink fans and power supply

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dsman19527611010010110

Reply 9 years ago

*and print out that comment, since during that your computer will be off, making it imposable to read the comment*

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killerjackalope

9 years ago

P4s run hot, I've the 3ghz one in my dell and had to add a second fan at the back to keep it cool. Thankfully they have a protection thing built in somehow, it'll lower speeds if there's too much heat, I accidentally tested this to extremes by powering up the computer with no heatsink attached while working on it, thankfully I yanked the power cord out but it was going fine. Did the same thing with a P2 once, thing was dead right away...

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More fans should do the trick, though my heatsink is much bigger than yours, it takes up a large chunk of the case...

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11010010110thermoelectric

Reply 9 years ago

there seems to be path above the plates where air can go if you block it and force all the air to go thru the spaces between the plates i thing it should be cooler

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11010010110killerjackalope

Reply 9 years ago

dell tend to use large good heatsinks. i like them thermoelectric : maybe you replace the fan on the cpu to more powerfull one ?

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Sandisk1duo

9 years ago

too hott!! change the fan on the CPU add a fan in the back of the Case if your power supply is blowing air out, make the fan blow air in, and vice versa

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11010010110thermoelectric

Reply 9 years ago

for better overall cooling (of the entire pc) the power supply fan and fan next to it should blow out

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11010010110thermoelectric

Reply 9 years ago

yep if you have a hole in the door infront of the cpu add the fan there instead (blowing in)

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11010010110thermoelectric

Reply 9 years ago

without it the power supply pulls air thru the entire box and cools it. some air enters thru this hole too with fan blowing in more air would enter the hole. but then this air is gonna be blwn out thru the power supply. the power supply won't pull air thru the entire box anymore and the far areas (southbridge and drives) may get hotter and overheat with fan blowing out both fans work in the same way. together they pull more air thru the entire pc and make it cooler. the cpu gets slightly hotter air but way more air in quantity so overall it should be better if you install addiionally a fan blowing in at the bottom of the front panel you ensure better cooling for that area of the computer. then you may want to put a fan that blows in near the power supply some newer cases have hole in the door (side panel) in front of the cpu. you can install there a fan that blows in to add cool air directly at the cpu

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thermoelectric11010010110

Reply 9 years ago

Oh, I think I might leave it the way it is now, 2 fans blowing out, 1 blowing in with gaps for more air to be moved....

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11010010110thermoelectric

Reply 9 years ago

are the gaps between fan and wall ? then the fan returns some of the hot air into the computer better leave no gaps

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thermoelectric11010010110

Reply 9 years ago

No gaps between fan and wall, there's just some in other parts of the case.

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thermoelectricSandisk1duo

Reply 9 years ago

Out (I meant the PSU fan and a extra fan blowing out, While one sucking in.)