83Views7Replies

Author Options:

Resistors? Answered

I'm trying to do the evaporator workaround for the Ford Fusion. Instructions from this page say to use 37kOhm 1/8 watt resistor. No one has this. Can I use other wattage rated resistors such as 47 kOhm 1/2 or 1/4 watt
?

Discussions

0
None
steveastrouk

Best Answer 2 years ago

You'd be better posting a question on the Instructable itself, or a link here to the appropriate instructable. How can we see the context ? 37K is not a common value. 33K, and 39K are. Provided the power rating is not less than 1/8W, you'll be fine.

0
None
DaleH48

2 years ago

Thanks all for your responses. I'll try the 33 or 39kOhm ones.

0
None
Downunder35m

2 years ago

Put 2 75k Ohm resistors parallel ;)
And if you check the chart then the resistor value sets the temp - so if you go under or over you are outside the 20° range.

0
None
Downunder35miceng

Answer 2 years ago

LOL Thanks a lot but that was only old school thinking.
Back in the days when we tried our own FM radio transmitters and similar we always required weird resistor values.
So you learned quite quickly how to combine the standard E series resistors to the value required.
Same story for values quite close to "normal" ones, like needing a 98kOhm one - we just got a bunch of 100K ones and selected the ones on the lower side of the tolerance scale ;)
Guess it is "knowledge" lost in some areas due to computers taking over LOL
But if I can't avoid it I use the same for LED arrays to save on resistors, although here I always aim for around 20% under the rated current of the LED to make sure I won't have failures because of one bad LED in an array of 20...

0
None
icengDownunder35m

Answer 2 years ago

I don't care how old (used it myself long ago too). These kids, have no idea what a bit of non-YouTube schooling in real electronics can do. Its a pleasure to see the solution even though most viewers do not understand...

0
None
petercd

2 years ago

Too big a jump, try the 36k or 39k instead, higher wattage no real probs in your application.