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Rotating multi-layer Face scupture Answered

Hi I would like to make a diy small scale version of the following video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yQ4Pscb-ZQ

Preferably a Lord Buddha head version of it.

I am pretty creative but not mechanically inclined.

challenges are as follows:_

1) how to get a 3d scan of a buddha head i already have

2) cut the 3d scan horizontally in multi layers

3) make a small scale model

4) make the different layers rotate and control individually

5) make it artsy...i am good with that so dont need much help

Discussions

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tomandreson11

3 months ago

Thanks for the information. It really works for me.

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rickharris

3 months ago

It strikes me that if your prepared to compromise a little on the looks you could mount the drive system outside the sculpture as in the diagram. this would be easier at a small size.

If light rubber bands would do for the drive belts and model motors for the drive.

Click on diagram for full size.

segments.jpg
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rickharris

3 months ago

If I were to do this I think I would try to use a single motor at the bottom driving a common shaft through each segment of the sculpture. The segments would be driven or not by a clutch mechanism at each segment. This probably takes up less space than a motor at each segment.

You are severely hampered by wanting to make a small version, this means you won't have the space to put the mechanism.

You would need to have some mechanism that indicated when the segment was in it's "home" position.

Driving in different directions calls for sme extra gearing. this could be simple rubber wheel rubbing on the inside of the core.

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rav527

3 months ago

I can probably contract out the 3d model and cutting. Whats intrigues me is the rotation and control of the multiple layers to be honest at this point. are there dedicated motors for each layer or single one?

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petercdrav527

Reply 3 months ago

Each layer has its own motor.

You'd also need bearings between each layer, something like small plastic BB's running in a groove.

So the base layer is stationary and all the others just stack up on BB bearings.

That way you can have a central support for all the motors at different layer heights, like a spiral staircase.

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petercd

3 months ago

Bear in mind the original used 42 motors, one for each layer, so your scale model will also need 1 motor per layer.

The smallest motor I can think of is the vibrate motor in cell phones, 5mm dia x 15mm length.

Mounting them all on the inside is going to need a large cavity with as many opto sensors as motors to determine the park position for the final image.

Then an Arduino with as many inputs as your layers as well as motor drive outputs.

No small undertaking.

Buddha busts on Thingiverse are plenty, https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:53925

Getting a 3D printer to print a range of layers as individual model slices will be another tricky item.

I'm guessing its not doable on a small scale.

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rav527petercd

Reply 3 months ago

Thanks Peter. Where did you find the details regarding the original project. I was researching on it on the internet without any luck.

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petercdrav527

Reply 3 months ago

From the video you posted.

Installed in 2014, the enormous mirrored bust is comprised of 42
independently driven layers of stainless steel and weighs in at some 45
tons.

The rest was from my imagination.

Normal steppers are too big to fit in a desk sized model, so I figured geared motors with an opto ring for positioning.

However, there is a tiny little stepper that changes the lens focus inside some Blu-Ray DVD drives which might be another alternative.

http://repairfaq.cis.upenn.edu/Misc/Blu-ray/site1/...


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rickharris

3 months ago

This will b very difficult to do:

1.You don't know how it works (only what it does)

2. It will be costly

3 You have identified a number of points - search there are instructables for making 3 d scanners. - There are many online sites that can, for a price, print such an object from a suitable file.

- Cutting it up neatly will be a big issue. - Rotation and control will require you start learning to use and programme microcontrollers.

It's a big big job.