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Slip ring Answered

I am looking to build a rotating electrical connector, better known (in the electrical world) as a slip ring.

The basics (my layperson terms) would include a stationary ring (fed by a power source AC/DC) and a rotating ring having 2-4 connecting points being in direct contact with the stationary ring allowing for power to be supplied to moving (rotating) devices connected to the connection points of the rotating ring.

Discussions

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Fixer101010

20 hours ago

Hi bill
I read your question there are a few way to do this. Knowing the voltage and amperage would help to offer a solution also dose it rotate more than 360deg and if so how fast

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rickharris

5 weeks ago

depending on the power passed through the slip rings and good old fashioned VCR tape head containg a supurb set of slip rings and bearings that could be repurposed.

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petercd

5 weeks ago

How I would do it is by scrounging brushes with their holders out of old/broken motors.

Cutting sections of matching width from a copper tube would serve as the slip ring side of things.

They would of course have to be insulated if slipped over a metal shaft, but that is easily done using a combination of resin and insulating paper used for motor windings.

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Jack A Lopez

5 weeks ago

Wikipedia has a page titled, "Slip ring",

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slip_ring

It also has a page for, "Brush(electric)" and "Commutator(electric)", which are related concepts.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brush_(electric)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commutator_(electric...

I am trying to think of an example of a common artifact, containing slip rings.

I think automotive alternators have slip rings, although it has been a while since I took apart an alternator. Actually these days, I do not have to actually take one apart to find out what is inside, since there is an abundance of pictures and diagrams available, just for the trouble of an image search for the same.

Universal motors contain brushes and commutators, which are similar, and discarded universal motors are very easy to find. Pretty much every tool with a motor that moves faster than the AC line frequency, which is 60 rev/second = 3600 rev/minute, is using a universal motor. Examples include, blenders, vacuum cleaners, electric drills, but not the cordless kind. Cordless power tools typically use brushed DC motors, which I guess also use brushes and commutators, but, for some reason, the brushes found in universal motors made to run on mains power, those brushes seem to be bigger and sturdier, than the ones found in brushed DC motors.

Anyway, I was thinking that maybe some existing artifact, preferably one that is cheap, or free as discarded junk, could serve as the source for your slip rings.

Unless all the existing things are totally the wrong shape for what you want to build, then I guess these could serve as inspiration only, for the thing you have to build from scratch.

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LargeMouthBass

5 weeks ago

If the application is not something where the rotation is not continuous or frequent, one quick and dirty solution would be something like an audio plug and jack. Some of these contain as many as four separate contacts.

If the application has the rotating device on a motor shaft or other situation where it would be spinning fast or expected to spin many cycles over its life, then the connector idea I described would be inadequate.