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Solder fume extractor with carbon and HEPA filters? Answered

I have been reading about the subject, and most articles tell that carbon filters are good for solder chemicals, fumes and odors, while HEPA filter are designed to remove dust, allergens and micro-organisms from the air.

Supposedly, solder fume extractors should use both filters for an efficient filtering of the chemicals. Is this correct?

Thanks for your time!

Source:
https://www.google.com.ar/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiWkOu6v8nPAhUIPJAKHXhDCgEQFgg1MAM&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.solderconnection.com%2Fspecsheets%2FLead-Free_Solder_Fumes_Increase_Need_for_Fume_Extraction.pdf&usg=AFQjCNHqetU2dZG3hSaRNmPIl1LhUObshw (The link redirects to a PDF file!)

Discussions

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seandogue

2 years ago

In expensive 1/4" thick Carbon filters are normally used in benchtop fume exhausters (they often use a 4 or 5" fan). I suppose a hepa couldn't hurt, but I'm not sure it's necessary.

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seandogueseandogue

Answer 2 years ago

erm we sure do need an edit feature... the word shoudl ahve been "Inexpensive" not "In expensive"

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Yonatan24seandogue

Answer 2 years ago

If you w'ont maeke mistaekes lkie me, you wont' neeed an eidt faeutre ;)

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seandogueYonatan24

Answer 2 years ago

I suppose that's the problem. I make mistakes but for some peculiar reason, they're not as evident when I'm typing as when it's published. I never declaerd that I was suitable for a secretarial position. Brain works well, but the finger-brain connection is kinda loose ;)

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seandogueseandogue

Answer 2 years ago

there is, btw, another reason for having an edit function. That of "add-ons", ie, posts like this, that add a caveat or postscript thought to an already existing post. Oh, and I missed a misspelliung in the previous reply.

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RampedUpDIY

2 years ago

Just having a fan or venting system to pull the fumes away is sufficient. I do my soldering outside so that the breeze will carry the fumes away and if it's raining I use my shop-vac to pull fumes into a crack in the floor... I should probably cover up that crack before winter hits =]:-)

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steveastrouk

2 years ago

Unless you are doing this many hours of every day, or you have an allergic reaction to the fumes, the exposure to "chemicals" is very low.

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rickharrissteveastrouk

Answer 2 years ago


Been
soldering for the best part of 55 years and never used any kind of
filter just common sense & don't hunch over my work to solder.

At worst a fan to draw the fumes away from you will do.

Remember all smell is particulate in nature so if you can smell it your breathing in particles.

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Yonatan24rickharris

Answer 2 years ago

What happened to your comment/profile picture?

Screenshot (99) edited.png
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rickharrisYonatan24

Answer 2 years ago

Ah I copied the original post because I made a spelling error and must have copied my image as well. 2 for the price of one!

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Yonatan24

2 years ago

Correct.

But... DO NOT use HEPA filters for soldering. Don't ask me how I know

The HEPA filter will absorb the smell from the flux fumes, and is pretty much impossible to remove. Once you turn the filter on, you whole room/workpace will smell like burnt flux. I ruined quite a bit of $$$ this way...

I guess that if you put the HEPA filter after the carbon filter, it will absorb the dust, but I wouldn't mix two different things together...

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Yonatan24Yonatan24

Answer 2 years ago

My filter has been out in the sun for weeks, and the smell is still horrible. The only idea I have now is to put it near an ionizer, which might help. I'm not sure...