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Somebody would teach us how to recharge a dead car battery with an old pc source power....? Answered

I`ve heard before that someone reload his dead car battery plugging it to an old pc font...but Ì would to know if somebody already do this...and if it works...

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Best Answer 8 years ago

Build this or one of the many others here. https://www.instructables.com/id/Convert-an-ATX-Power-Supply-Into-a-Regular-DC-Powe/
Then connect the + to + and - to - and plug it in. It won't charge very fast, might over heat the power supply because the battery is going to be a huge load on it. Might not even charge to full battery capacity but might be enough to get a car started then charge the rest of the way.

If it sparks around the battery there might be an explosion because one of the by products of charging is a release of hydrogen gas.

Good luck.

Hi there Would u pls vote for my entry ...?
https://www.instructables.com/id/Homemade-Belt-No-sew/
thnks

You need a supply in excess of 12V to recharge a car-battery (that's worth recharging) at least 13, more like 14. If you removed the voltage regulator from th PSU you might get enough. It would be wise to fit an ammeter in order to measure what's going in and how the charge is progressing. It may be simplest to take out the transformer & rectifier, re-connect & just go with that. Multimeter would be almost essential. L

Hi there Would u pls vote for my entry ...?
https://www.instructables.com/id/Homemade-Belt-No-sew/
thnks


Hot-crimp nice. I'll look at all the entries, thanks for reminding me.

L

Me Too...! Thnk u so much...i´ll do the same when u need it...

It's better to use a 15V laptop power supply, since that's just a bit higher than necessary to charge a battery.  Batteries generally begin taking a charge with 12V applied, and as they recharge, the voltage rises until it reaches about 13.8 to 14.4 volts when they're full.  (Actual voltage depends on temperature... sophisticated chargers actually compensate for that.)  Put a resistor in series (in line with the wire) to limit current   A one ohm resistor would work, but it would need to dissipate nearly 10 watts when the battery first begins charging; 2 or 3 ohms wouldn't charge as fast, but wouldn't get so hot.

Hi there Would u pls vote for my entry ...?
https://www.instructables.com/id/Homemade-Belt-No-sew/
thnks