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String Theory,..this is not detailed, but what do you think? Answered

Here is a short video (not embeddable, sorry) on the Higgs-Boson and string theory by Dr. Michio Kaku.  Comments?

Discussions

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lemonie

6 years ago

I don't like the chopping camera-angles, it makes no sense; someone thought it would make things look more interesting but it's just a distraction.
Nice talk, everything does come down to vibrations in the end.

L

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Sovereigntylemonie

Reply 6 years ago

Was that a fart joke?


Sorry, I couldn't resist.

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lemonieSovereignty

Reply 6 years ago

No, where did you get a flatus-reference in there?

L

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Sovereigntylemonie

Reply 6 years ago

The last few words...

I guess I'm just a 38 year old who's still amused by immature things.

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GoodhartSovereignty

Reply 6 years ago

Bah, if we lose out ability to think diversely THEN we've become old.....never give that up :-) Hey, I pointed it out and I am 53 LOL

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Lithium Rainlemonie

Reply 6 years ago

Even I picked up on that one... ("vibrations in the end", for the record)

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jaffawarrior1

6 years ago

STRING THEORY IS THE FUTURE OF PHYSICS LOOP QUANTUM GRAVITY IS NOTHING THX 4 LISTENING FOLKS LOL

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Goodhartjaffawarrior1

Reply 6 years ago

Typing in all caps (internet shouting) is not necessary....

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colorex

6 years ago

I understood every single thing he said!

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colorexGoodhart

Reply 6 years ago

That was sarcasm :)

Though I understood some of it!

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Goodhartcolorex

Reply 6 years ago

Oh sorry, I don't always recognize sarcasm even face to face *blush* Then I suppose the book: Quintessence: the search for the missing mass of the universe; would be a bit beyond you then :-)

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colorexGoodhart

Reply 6 years ago

Don't worry...
Well, maybe if I was updated on the topic I would understand it, right now I'm completely into RC planes, not so much into science. But If I read up on it I would surely understand it.

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Goodhartcolorex

Reply 6 years ago

Oh and I didn't mean to imply that you were dumb or anything, just that the book I mentioned would be a bit much at your current knowledge level. I found it fascinating and have moved on to others like it (but I have a varied thirst for understanding and am also reading up on brain physiology/function, electrochemical reactions, and quantum theory, to name a few)....I find it fun to find out things....especially the things I can experiment with later (like electronics).

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colorexGoodhart

Reply 6 years ago

WOW! You're awesome! That's some heavy reading! I could read up on physics, but I am dumb on electrochemical reactions!

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Goodhartcolorex

Reply 6 years ago

Well, starting with "how a battery works" and working your way up to how solar cells work would help in the electrochemical area....it's a start anyways :-)

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colorexGoodhart

Reply 6 years ago

Yeah, I know. I know that the acid in a battery produces an electrochemical reaction with the metallic plates, producing energy; but solar cells, I know just that they do work!

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Goodhartcolorex

Reply 6 years ago

Not all batteries (or cells to be more accurate) use "acid" however. But yes, the principle is nearly the same in all of them, no matter the chemicals used (nickel metal hydride, etc, & etc.).
Then there is plating, de-plating (stipping), oxidation, infusion, and many other things that can be done this way.
The world of physical-chemical reactions are also multitude however.  Take for instance simple glycerin.   Put a drop on a small pile of permanganese dioxide and you will have purple flames and smoke galore.  

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colorexGoodhart

Reply 6 years ago

BTW Would you know how to make a smoke bomb? Non-toxic, easy and cheap? maybe also for a streamer on a plane?

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Goodhartcolorex

Reply 6 years ago

sugar, burned quickly and without much of an O2 supply will smoke like crazy.  A mix with potassium nitrate when burned will produce a fair volume of smoke. 

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colorexGoodhart

Reply 6 years ago

Potassium nitrate... does that ignite with sulfuric acid?

And should it be powder sugar?

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Goodhartcolorex

Reply 6 years ago

If one, under the proper conditions (again, this is NOT safe outside a controlled lab), burns sulfur and potassium nitrate, they can produce sulfuric acid. But doing this outside the lab can potentially produce enough of it in vapor form to give a person severe burns "from the inside out".

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colorexGoodhart

Reply 6 years ago

Oh, I remember now, school experiment: Sugar, potassium *chlorate* and sulphuric acid. Big fast flame, but not much smoke.

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Lithium RainGoodhart

Reply 6 years ago

Careful though - that's one ingredient short of gunpowder. :D (Also, on a pedantic note, it's not non-toxic - even ignoring the fairly standard "if you eat this or rub it on your skin it will be unpleasant" effects, it's a known producer of human carcinogens.)

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colorexLithium Rain

Reply 6 years ago

Potassium nitrate is carcinogen?? The first gunpowder had 1 x coal powder, 1x sulphur, and 6x nitrates... Is this right?

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Goodhartcolorex

Reply 6 years ago

Yes, my apologies, I should have given the warning that it "can" become potentially dangerous; it burns brightly if not quickly, if enough "carbon" is present, and produces a lava like molten substance with potential to ignite what it is laying in, or other nasty offshoots. And yes, the sugar should be powdered. The amount of heat produced by a violent burn, can be hazardous in many ways.

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colorexGoodhart

Reply 6 years ago

Well, I'm careful by nature with chemical compounds. I plan on making smoke streamers for an RC airplane. I read on Wikipedia that potassium nitrate will melt with sugar at medium temperatures.

However, I need to know how to make sure that the mixture doesn't explode, but burns gradually. I know this has something to do with how it's packed into the tube that contains it. But I don't know for sure...

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Goodhartcolorex

Reply 6 years ago

Hmmm, I have never been able to make "really fast burning" black powder (especially without the sulfur). It burns fairly fast, BUT not like gunpowder, more like a fuse :-) I am sure a little experimentation (done carefully) would yield results that would rival my experiences however.

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colorexGoodhart

Reply 6 years ago

I need it to burn gradually into a tube, and make it last for a minute or so...

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Goodhartcolorex

Reply 6 years ago

I've never been able to make it burn THAT quickly....YMMV. Careful experiments should yield results similar to mine however.

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Lithium Raincolorex

Reply 6 years ago

No, it isn't a carcinogen itself; under certain (fairly common) conditions it can produce them (nitrosamines, specifically). It's a somewhat pedantic point because AFAIK casual contact with limited amounts of potassium nitrate (as opposed to potassium nitrite, which is itself a carcinogen) isn't actually going to hurt anything. But, y'know, still technically makes stuff that gives you cancer. :P
 
I dunno - Google it. :P Point isn't that it will magically transform into gunpowder, but that with that combination you have a very strong oxidizer mixed with a fast-burning fuel, which you ought to be aware of before you start. :)

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Lithium RainLithium Rain

Reply 6 years ago

*Seems I remember that wrong - potassium nitrite isn't demonstrably itself a carcinogen, but is similar to nitrate in producing nitrosamines and having a _suspected_ rather than a confirmed link to cancer.

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lemonieLithium Rain

Reply 6 years ago

It's eating it with protein, like in bacon & other cured-meats, that produces these nitosamines.
Technically "bacon gives you cancer".

L

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Goodhartlemonie

Reply 6 years ago

bacon and picnic hams :-D Ugh, I still remember the smell of those things after they were pumped full of nitrates at the rendering plant I worked for 30+ years ago....*shiver* I limit my swine intake to this day because of it.

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SovereigntyGoodhart

Reply 6 years ago

I still remember what this topic started as, looking back....we should start heading back to physics starting with chaos.

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GoodhartLithium Rain

Reply 6 years ago

True enough, however, anyone that has attempted (innocent whistle concerning actions 35+ years ago) to make black powder has found that is it not simple to make so that it burns efficiently ;-)

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Goodhartblkhawk

Reply 6 years ago

Oh yes, I have read up much more detail in the theory itself, I just wanted to know if this was intelligible to others, or if they felt he "stretched things a bit". :-)

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iceng

6 years ago

Appreciating your post !

A

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Goodharticeng

Reply 6 years ago

Yeah, I have read up on this a little bit, and he does an excellent job of simplifying....but often the details I crave I need to get from another source....I DO like his different shows he appears in though :-)