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What can I do with my dead AA batteries? Answered

Besides throw them away.

Edit: Or make them into art. You can make anything into art, so that's a given.

I have both rechargables and non-rechargables. And I can't be the only one with a buttload of dead batteries idly lying around the home left over from the 90s.

Discussions

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gotja

11 years ago

noooooo if you shoot it fast enought with enough momentum from a air gun it will explode and it has hydrocloric acid aka stomach acid and stomach acid has a tendency to burn you.....

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GoodhartPatrick Pending

Reply 11 years ago

No, but with a bit of reflux it can burn your esophagus. ;-)

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gotjaPatrick Pending

Reply 11 years ago

because your stomach is lined with things so stomach acid cant go through i think thats wat a ulcer is i forgot lol for example in the civil war if you got shot in the stomach you were in for a slow and painfull death cuz stomach acid would burn all your organs and die or stomach acid will burn all your organs and ull bleed to death

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gotjagotja

Reply 11 years ago

that is not a ulcer

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westfwgotja

Reply 11 years ago

ALKALINE batteries do NOT contain Hydrochloric acid. (I don't think any common batteries contain HCl, but I'm awfully sure about alkalines :-)
(Alkalines probably contain lye or a close equivalent, which is probably worse...)

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gotjawestfw

Reply 11 years ago

oo i thought it was hydrocloric acid hmm i know there is acid in it

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Goodhartgotja

Reply 11 years ago

This is what Westfw was saying, Alkaline is the opposite of an acid, but a strong alkaline will actually burn worse than many acids.

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westfwGoodhart

Reply 11 years ago

BTW, while I've said bad things about MSDS info elsewhere, this is a good example of what they ought to be good for: "what are the harmful components of an alkaline battery." And it turns out that a few seconds of web search does indeed turn up MSDS for Duracell Alkaline Battery, and it's a pretty good one. Notably:

Notes to Physician
1) The primary acutely toxic ingredient is concentrated (35%) potassium hydroxide.

Here's a nice Collection of battery MSDS data

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Goodhartwestfw

Reply 11 years ago

Thankfully the only cell I ever "disassembled" (with a saw) when younger, was the only battery available at the time...the zinc-carbon cell (it still ruined my Dad's saw though). Still, it wasn't something to fool around with. Great link, thanks.

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GoodhartGoodhart

Reply 11 years ago

CHARACTERISTICS OF RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES

Recharge Fast Self
Energy Cycles Charge Discharge
Density To 80% Time Per
(Wh/Kg)* Capacity (hours) Month

Nickel
Cadmium 45-80 1500 1 20%

Nickel
Metal
Hydride 60-120 300-500 2-4 30%

Lithium
Ion 110-160 300-500 2-4 10%

Lithium
Polymer 100-130 300-500 2-4 10%

Lead Acid 30-50 200-300 8-16 5%
(automobile/truck)
To 50%
Capacity

Reusable
Alkaline 80 50 2-3 0.3%

This data is provided courtesy of
Cadex Electronics Inc. (www.cadex.com).

  • Wh/Kg = watt hours per kilogram
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westfwGoodhart

Reply 11 years ago

If I'm translating the formatting correctly, that seems very optimistic about the self-discharge characteristics of NiMH, and pessimistic about Li-ion/polymer. Most of the NiMH batteries I've tried to use are essentially dead after a month of non-use (new styles are better, though), while the Li/Ion 'dead' laptop batteries I've picked out of recycling and disassembled still have considerable oomph many months after their last charge (and they were supposed to be dead!)

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Goodhartwestfw

Reply 11 years ago

Hmm, I read it to mean that the "%" was "usage in a month" or drain in a month, which would be 3 times faster for the NiMH. But I could be wrong.

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Goodhartgotja

Reply 11 years ago

Now, automobile batteries use acid (sulphuric acid), and are known as "lead-acid" batteries. Technically, the AA "battery" is only a single "cell" whereas a battery is usually more then one "cell" (an automobile battery is lined with plates or cells, for instance).

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revelation

10 years ago

SHOOT THEM AT THINGS USEING A HOMEMADE SLINGSHOT/WRIST-ROCKET.

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gotja

11 years ago

me neither but just incase it does explodes thats what i mean (HIGHLY UNLIKLY!!!!)

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gotja

11 years ago

huh? I said I was 13 and i Advised not to do that but..its your life

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gotjagotja

Reply 11 years ago

and what does spelling have to do what were talking about

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ktkutthroat

11 years ago

I think you should make them into art. I mean, c'mon, who uses dead batteries to make art? Make a statue of Optimus Prime. ~KT

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gotja

11 years ago

DUDE What does what we are talking about have to do with grammer?? I'll tell you NOTHING

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Goodhartgotja

Reply 11 years ago

o ok thats good but personaly i still woulndt to that coming from a 13 year old

I think he thought you said he was 13.

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Aeshir

11 years ago

HAH! You buy non-rechargables! What a foo. xD Seriously, you save tons of money and I think it's better for the environment too. I like nickel metal hydride cells (yeah they're actually called cells, a battery is when you put more than one in a circuit) because you don't have to discharge them before charging them (unlike nickel-cadmium cells).

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gotja

11 years ago

o ok thats good but personaly i still woulndt to that coming from a 13 year old obsesed with guns is a very good reason lol but your life

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westfw

11 years ago

(on a serious note, many electronics stores will now accept used/dead batteries for recycling, due to their supposed "hazardous waste" nature (Cadmium in NiCds, Lead in Lead-acid, and sometimes small amounts of mercury in a lot of the other types (for rather obscure reasons.)) We have special bins at work, where I take my dead batteries, and where I rescue batteries that might still have "other uses" until I return the useless bits that remain.)

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Goodhartwestfw

Reply 11 years ago

The local community here has a battery collection recycler that is in conjunction with the recycled bottles, newspapers, cans, and plastics. The only think I liked about the older "non-alkaline" batteries, was that carbon rod in the center which afforded me with a nearly inexhaustible supply of "terminals" for electroplating or "cutting rods" for my 110 A welder.

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Brennn10

11 years ago

Collect up about 100 of them, take them to a recycling center, and make them pay you for you to give them to them.

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Patrick Pending

11 years ago

Re-charge them. Cheers, Pat. Pending

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GoodhartPatrick Pending

Reply 11 years ago

I wouldn't attempt this with alkaline batteries. They tend to leak or explode...

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Patrick PendingGoodhart

Reply 11 years ago

They can do, but many people successfully manage it. It is important to use the right technique. Cheers, Pat. Pending

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GoodhartPatrick Pending

Reply 11 years ago

That's true, even with rechargeables, one should either use the proper charger, or if constructing their own, make it to the specs needed for the battery that would be required to prevent these "events".

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westfw

11 years ago

Well, if they're not COMPLETELY dead, you could build a Joule Thief. Quoting:
The amazing thing about this circuit is that it will run right down to about 0.35V if left running continuously, and will often provide a week of continuous low level light from a battery that would normally be considered dead.

Of course, then you have batteries that are really dead, and you still need to know what to do with them...

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gotjawestfw

Reply 11 years ago

you could shoot them but they have a tendancy to hold hydrocloric acid "stomach acid" so i wouldnt but i have freinds that do lol what i was thinking was just like try to set a record of how many batteries you ahve and be in the record books

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gotja

11 years ago

well batteries tned to have acid thats harmfull to you realy hormfull like stomach acid

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crestind

11 years ago

I think you can use the batteries for the office supply trebuchet.

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pepperm

11 years ago

I agree with westfw, make a joule thief. I have a small PCB that fits onto the end of a PCB mounting battery holder. The circuit uses a couple of salvaged SMD NPN transistors, a few caps and an inductor and will run a blue LED for a few weeks continuously. They provide very useful night lights for my kids and helps my sons night time toilet aiming abilities :-) I have tested all LED colours and find blue to be the best night light, oddly. Mark

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Skyfinity

11 years ago

AA's often have nothing special about them but battery acid. Other Batteries can be hacked, as they are often made up of smaller batteries, but 1.5 pretty low voltage, so it's made up of all of the "dangerous" Stuff. Cool Experiment= Harvest acid, find out what materials it dissolves.

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Juklop

11 years ago

Feed them to your neighbors cat.

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Firebert010

11 years ago

Make a PVC air gun with 1/2" tubing and shoot them.

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TheCheese9921

11 years ago

build an abstract art piece of giant battery then sell it to a museum for millions

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Goodhart

11 years ago

Well, in the days gone by, they had a carbon rod running down the center of (zinc chloride) them (the rest of the battery was pretty much useless).

With alkaline batteries, the cathode is a mixture of manganese dioxide, graphite and an electrolyte.

The mixture is granulated, aged, and then compacted into a pressed tablet assembly. Next, these tablets are inserted into a steel can. The steel can and the mixture thus become the cathode of the alkaline battery.

The dead battery society describes one use, embedding a rom chip to disable "games" as the battery goes dead. *shrug* beats me why they would want this to happen though.