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What is the maximum amount of electricity that can be derived from a dynamo? (size, specs, no bar)? Answered


What is the maximum amount of electricity that can be derived from a dynamo? (size, specs, no bar)?

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VCool123

8 years ago

Yeah, I know it's a bit vague, sorry. Appreciate the humor though. It should at least be usable by an average man (crank and stuff). How about one (or an assembly) which could be as big as a standard double-door refrigerator, and still be able to power at least 2 sets of lights and fans? I know it's still vague, but there's no better place to ask.

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seandogue

8 years ago

If you're talking a bike dynamo, it's easy enough to look them up online at Shimano etc. As I recall, many bike dynamos are pretty low output 6-12V a ~2-300mA. The idea is to power a lamp or two while not negatively impacting the rider's experience (ie, causing noticeable drag)

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orksecurity

8 years ago

See that hydroelectric dam over there? ....

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orksecurityorksecurity

Answer 8 years ago

Or, consider the superconducting dynamo that the National Magnet Lab was playing with for a while. The only way they could find a load large enough to dump the energy into was to sell power to the electric company. If you don't set physical limits, there aren't physical limits.

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NachoMahma

8 years ago

.  0 <= x < 1000. The unit-of-measure depends on, among other things, the specs of your turbine, the specs of your dynamo, and the amount of energy available to drive it all.

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kelseymh

8 years ago

You need to specify the hardware, then you can determine (or just look up) the current/voltage output. Otherwise, your question is too vague to be answered.

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steveastrouk

8 years ago

Do you mean a bicycle dynamo ?