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What size should i make my copper coil for the size of my magnets!? Answered

hello fellow people.

i am about to make some copper coils to use to create electrcity when i pass my magnets.

i am new to this are of work and this is a home project for myself, any information would help greatly, and also some links to youtube videos that are very clear o understand as im not the 'quick' with things i dont understand.

so.... i am using 25mm x 10mm x 3mm (lengh/width/depth) neodymuim magnets, rectangular shape, and im using 2mm insulated copper wire. i have purchased 30 of these magnets and am planning to stack them in sets of 4, and have six sets, and idealy make six coils for the magnets to pass, the coils being stationary and the magnets on a peice of wood that rotates via a pully.

what size should i make my coils? i understand my coils inside diamiter should be the same size as the longest part of my magnet, ie;25mm, but how wide should my coil be? thats the bit that eludes me, i have added a picture to try help my explanation if this helps, thanks in advance for any information that you can give.

Discussions

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iceng

3 years ago

You do not discuss the magnetic flux path !

coil.jpg
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MAR5HM3LL0Wiceng

Answer 3 years ago

I have looked at magnetic flux, and now understand the meaning of it, so should I explain the movement of the magnets in relation of the coils? would that be classed as the magnetic flux path ?

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icengMAR5HM3LL0W

Answer 3 years ago

The way to generate the most output power is to have the most flux pass through or alternate one way then the other way the most wires most often.

Are you trying to generate 3-phase AC or single line AC ?

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MAR5HM3LL0Wrickharris

Answer 3 years ago

hiya, yes that is essentially my aim to build. but not to use wind to turn the prop, also, I was hoping to mke my own coils and use my own magnets to produce the electricity rather than use an existing motor/generator ?

here is a link to the kind of thing I was looking at.....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKDYeyu0R30

also, here is one referring to the one continuous loop I was referring to,...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKcFxve8EuQ

im not sure what is better? and also still none the wiser to the reason for metal being the board to attach my magnets too?

. I have spent last night looking at magnetic flux, an I now understand the meaning by it, like the change in the magnetic area, also only changing when a magnet is moving..

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iceng

3 years ago

Ever notice working electric generators are NOT made of wood.

Every motor maker / repair shop winds the same individual coils and places them into physical position and then wires them together.

But if you want to, it will work, if you wind them in one continuous long loop of wire.

Magnetic Flux is a second year collage electrical course. Did you ever see iron filings on cardboard with a magnet underneath ?

Fluxlines.png
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MAR5HM3LL0W

3 years ago

Hello, thank you for your reply =]

I just googled magnetic flux path I don't understand it? Also should I wind the six coils separately or wind them all in one continued loop? And is there a reason for the board to be metal, I was under the impression wood would not affect the magnets path of pull?

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steveastroukMAR5HM3LL0W

Answer 3 years ago

Spend more than an hour and a half researching magnets. Yes. There is a reason for the board to be iron, your impression is incorrect.