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Work for NASA Doing Nothing... Absolutely Nothing Answered

NASA wants to find some special people to pay to lie in a bed for 90 days straight. No moving about, no getting up, just lying there awake for 16 hours and sleeping for 8 hours a day. If you can handle it and this even sounds somehow appealing to you, NASA will pay you $17,000 for it. That's $1,000 a week since there are periods for tests and recovery.

The goal is to see what effect microgravity has on the human body. It also sounds like some new form of torture.

Don't have 17 weeks to spare? Then maybe the 41 day study is for you. Then again, that study requires you to be on a human centrifuge for an hour a day for 21 days. Yikes!

Bed Rest Study
Artificial Gravity Project

Discussions

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Goodhart

10 years ago

I have trouble staying awake sitting upright (at dept. meetings, at home watching tv, anytime I am not "working on something" I tend to doze) Although the centrifuge thing doesn't sound too bad, as long is it isn't going to go so fast as to separate the water out of my blood stream :-)

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GoodhartKeith-Kid

Reply 10 years ago

Well, a small one like Kiteman's, takes a gram of substance and spins it in a container so fast that several decades of G forces are created. In the bigger one that NASA uses, it takes a human and whirls them about a center like some amusement park rides, only a lot faster. The one at NASA, if I remember correctly, can create up to 20 g's in force (make you weigh 20 x's heavier).

147220main_20G99-0130-40%201.jpg
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Hello KittyGoodhart

Reply 10 years ago

It's also kind of like swinging water in a bucket. As you swing the bucket,(if you're swinging fast enough) the water stays in the bottom of the bucket, but the bucket continues to move. It's really cool!

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GoodhartHello Kitty

Reply 10 years ago

Yes, up to a point. Once the g forces start to make you feel like your head is flattening out....well, it isn't so much fun anymore LOL

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Hello KittyGoodhart

Reply 10 years ago

Ever been to hershey park? There's a ride there that goes at 5g. Its REALY fun!

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GoodhartHello Kitty

Reply 10 years ago

Ever been to Hershey Park?

Yeah, I remember when you could take food inside the park, and you had to buy tickets to the rides you went on. If you just wanted a nice spot to picnic and let the kids (me and my bother, way back then) on a few rides, it was a really cheap outing.

I haven't been there in years though, at least 5 or so. I do remember I rode with my little sister (she was in her 20's) on the Comet at the time, and I noticed that, now that I am older, the fear of death in such situations kind of comes out LOL

The "Looper" I don't mind so much, it is a smooth ride. But the Comet reminds me too much of the Jack Rabbit of Rocky Springs fame (just south of Lancaster, long gone now).

Which ride, at Hershey park, are you referring to exactly? The Roter spun fast enough to get up to that, but I don't think that is there anymore.

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Hello KittyGoodhart

Reply 10 years ago

I don't remember the name (I haven't been to Hershey in a few years either), but I do remember a sign saying =5g= in big bold letters. I'll have to look it up... just a minute:-)

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MillenniumManHello Kitty

Reply 8 years ago

It's the Time Tunnel, and it's at Kings Dominion in Virginia. The ride operators say you can't stand in it, but they're wrong. It's hard as hell to do.

Imagine a 200 lb me on the walls of the tube. That's 200 lbs of normal me, somewhere around 800-900 lbs of me on the surface of..... some big planet.... Or mooseknucke woman on the Maury Povich show.

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GoodhartHello Kitty

Reply 10 years ago

Hmm, it must have been longer since I have been there, I don't remember that sign......and I probably would not have gotten into anything worse then the Super Dooper Looper, or the one kiddie roller coaster (in the far corner of the parks, I forgot it's name; but my wife likes this one LOL). :-)

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Hello KittyGoodhart

Reply 10 years ago

I might be wrong, (the last time I was there I was, like, 10, so the letters might have seemed bigger at the time) I googled it, but couldn't find anything. Maybe The Whip, but I'm not sure. I do remember that you went into a circular room thingie, and that it went around in a circle(really fast:-). You were strapped onto the thing and it had blue padding. The force was so strong that it pressed my head against the blue padding. It was REALLY fun, tough. I do remember that much. :-)

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GoodhartHello Kitty

Reply 10 years ago

Yeah I remember that one.

The one I was looking for, and finally found, was called The TrailBlazer it really is a quick little roller coaster but is nice a smooth going like the Super Dooper Looper (in fact, it used that technology before the looper was in existence) but because it is a kids ride it has no loops ;-).

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Hello KittyGoodhart

Reply 10 years ago

Cool! My favorite rides are are the superfast ones. I went to universal studios a year or two ago, and I think that my favorite ride there was The Hulk. Well, either that or
Dr. Doom's Fear Fall. Both ROCK! I went on them OVER and OVER and OVER again.

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GoodhartHello Kitty

Reply 10 years ago

I remember one (but can't remember the name...Hymalayan or something like that), but they took that one out. Someone was either hurt or killed accidentally on it.

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Hello KittyGoodhart

Reply 10 years ago

YIKES! I hope so! Isn't there one called The Runaway Mouse or something like that? I remember a ride called something like that, my uncle took me on it and right before the ride started he told me that only a few people had been killed when the cars when over the edge (It was a really fast ride, and made really sharp turns). After the ride he told me that he was kidding, but it ruined the ride for me. But after I know he was kidding it was pretty fun. P.S.Sorry for all this in your forum, fungus amungus. If you want we can move this somewhere else. :-)

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GoodhartHello Kitty

Reply 10 years ago

if you mean making =5g= into

5g

it needs to be on "it's own line" to work. It is finicky that way ;-)

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Hello KittyGoodhart

Reply 10 years ago

But that's the part that I like the most! :-)

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GoodhartHello Kitty

Reply 10 years ago

I tend to black out.....*sigh* something to do with my compromised blood flow or something :-)

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PatrikGoodhart

Reply 10 years ago

The reasoning behind the "complete bed rest" study is that it provides a reasonable simulation of the long-term effects of weightlessness on the body.

The centrifuge study then is the logical follow-up: can astronauts avoid the long-term effects of weightlessness by spending an hour a day at a *higher* than 1g gravity.

A manned Mars expedition, for example, would have to spend at least half a year in space just to get to Mars. We know from experience that such long bouts of weightlessness - even with regular exercise - take a significant toll on the body. However, once the astronauts get to Mars, they have to be fit enough for very physically demanding tasks, in a Mars gravity.

This is why most designs for long-term space travel include spinning part of the ship on its axis, to provide artificial gravity. Question is - do they just need to spin a small "exercise" section, where the astronauts can get a high-G workout once a day? Or would they need to spin the entire ship, which would be a logistical nightmare (Coriolis forces, aiming antennas, different centrifugal forces throughout the cabin, etc...)

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GoodhartPatrik

Reply 10 years ago

The reasoning behind the "complete bed rest" study is that it provides a reasonable simulation of the long-term effects of weightlessness on the body.

This may be so for younger persons, for me it would only create a better possibility for me to end up with blood clots in my legs :-)

The centrifuge study then is the logical follow-up: can astronauts avoid the long-term effects of weightlessness by spending an hour a day at a *higher* than 1g gravity.

And that would only play havoc in my stomach *sigh* (if I went from the centrifugal force machine to weightlessness). But, it wouldn't be so bad if I came out of it, into regular gravity :-)

Or would they need to spin the entire ship, which would be a logistical nightmare (Coriolis forces, aiming antennas, different centrifugal forces throughout the cabin, etc...)

Just tossing a balled up piece of paper into a waste paper basket would be nearly impossible :-) Wow ! Did you see the curve I put on that !

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Alexa Lexani

8 years ago

Where Do I SIGN!!!! LOL

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yourcat

10 years ago

Think how out of shape I would get... not a chance of me doing that.

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Patrikyourcat

Reply 10 years ago

That's precisely the point: muscle loss, bone loss, all of that good stuff... This is why they pay you $17K to participate, and why they include a recovery period at the end, to allow you to get back in shape before they throw you out on the street...

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yourcatPatrik

Reply 10 years ago

I still wouldn't. Sorry.

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skunkbait

10 years ago

It looked like an old study, but I still applied. I am desperate for a break in the monotony that is my life. Do you think tularemia,malaria, and Dengue Fever will keep me from getting the gig?

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Patrik

10 years ago

Here's some more info, from NASA's website:

One Man's Rest is Another Man's Research
Artificial Gravity for Long Space Missions (pdf)

- Yep, you stay horizontal the *whole* time, including eating, showering and going to the bathroom - no mention of diapers though...

- The centrifuge only does 2.5g - that's nothing compared to the forces jet fighters undergo in tight curves, but still enough to feel like a really fat person is sitting on top of you... If they use the small centrifuge in the pdf article, you would probably only barely get 1g at your head though.

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Hello KittyPatrik

Reply 10 years ago

2.5, Huh? There's a ride at hershey park that operates at 5g! (5 is faster than 2.5, right?) (It was a lot of fun!)

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Plasmana

10 years ago

WHAT!?! Stay in bed strictly for 90 days!?! How do you stay clean, what can you do for 16 hours each day, and so on. I think I will pass BUT that $17,000 makes choices harder...

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GorillazMiko

10 years ago

I'll do it, but you can't eat?

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hydrnium.h2

10 years ago

Apparently, you lose something close to 40-60 percent of your body's muscle mass, which is all converted to fat. So don't be so excited, you probably would have difficulty walking after this.

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Tool Using Animal

10 years ago

When they say strict bed rest do they mean wearing a diaper, sponge bath bed rest? I'll pass.

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Keith-Kid

10 years ago

straight? I could do this, but, at least a break every week!

Does it specify what things you can do in bed. Say videogames, eating, reading..

Wow...16 hours awake?!!

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Poppa ChubbyKeith-Kid

Reply 10 years ago

Really Keith, we don't want to know what you'd do in the bed. Really. :o

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Keith-KidPoppa Chubby

Reply 10 years ago

don't be stupid like that! Of course I'll tell you anyway!! Seriously, well have none of that humor here.

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ledzep567

10 years ago

wouldnt you get bed sores...

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LinuxH4x0r

10 years ago

I'll do it for 17k