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any one know what type of part this is? Answered

some help please. this part is busted. it is a camera circuit iv been using to charge capacitors because im some what of a noob atm with electronics.  iv been using it to charge bigger capacitors then what it usually charges. it started screeching louder then normal when charging and it let off a small cloud of smoke. so i opened it up to see what happened and i found a crack in the of the part. im guessing its small high volt capacitor but im not sure. any one know what part this is? and if i can replace it with a better part so it wont crack again?  

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iceng

Best Answer 4 years ago

A film Capacitor 47nF 250 Volts peak.

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justin.espinoza.790iceng

Answer 4 years ago

thanks :) im going to replace it. is it possible i can replace it with a higher rating capacitor to handle the stress? or would puting on a higher rateing capacitor start to make other parts work harder and brake them?

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icengjustin.espinoza.790

Answer 4 years ago

The voltage can be higher since it is a protective rating.

But, the 47 nF value is part of a resonating circuit ( tank ckt ) and I would advise not changing that as it could produce a lower output or fail to oscillate altogether.

BTW you took a very good picture, and looking at that cap at full resolution makes me believe it is an interleaved design possibly a specialty brand and you may have to try various polycarbonate or discharge flash capacitors to make it work.

Then again you mentioned smoke and that suggests a liquid electrolyte

If it came from that capacitor and that crack would be a steam rupture.

You are sure that no other component was damaged and smoked like a resistor ?

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icengiceng

Answer 4 years ago

And it looks like part of a tank ckt oscillator circuit, so a plain disc cap wont do.

You need a low ESR non-electrolytic capacitor see

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equivalent_series_res...

I would try re-soldering the crack with a 2% silver / tin / lead solder careful lower temperatures.

BTW it is usually the inductive red component that makes the most noise.

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icengiceng

Answer 4 years ago

High voltage puts mechanical stress on the capacitor metallic elements,

I think that cap was forced into holes too far apart and your crack was forced on low strength bond between the wire and capacitor edge as time after time voltage stress was applied.