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auto generating morse code device Answered

Need ideas on building an auto generating morse code signal for a geocache I'm building. The idea is, a user will plug a battery into the device and as long as the battery is plugged in the device will emit looping morse code message either with sound or light, preferably light.

Thanks for any ideas!

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rickharris

3 years ago

microprocessor almost certainly - A raspberry pi can be configured to act as transmitter as well.

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luckydog1313

3 years ago

Thank you for the input. Let expand a little on what I'm shooting for. When you post a geocache you can tell cachers to be prepared and bring certain tools or items they will need such as a D cell battery for example. The cache I'm designing is pirate themed. I have a large peep hole lens like you would have on your front door. My thoughts were to fashion a spyglass type device that someone would look through and see a blinking light on the other side, generating looping LED flashes after inserting a battery on the outside of the box.

The Arduino idea is interesting and I'm looking into it. From what I've looked at it seems like something within my scope of abilities to accomplish. My only concern would be environmental. The device would be in a water proof enclosure but still subject to temperature extremes. (I live in north Texas).

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Toga_Dan

3 years ago

the phonograph was initially to be a telegraph recorder. But when oversped, it produced various tones. Downunder thought he was going oldschool... ;)

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Downunder35m

3 years ago

Might be totally oldschool but what about using a simple tape recorder or things like a classic Walkman?
Record the morse as audio signals and everyone can play the tape - minimal electronics required.
You can also get sound modules that record up to 2 minutes dirt cheap on Ebay.

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Omnivent

3 years ago

Hi,

For a fixed message, I'd just hard-code it (via e.g. a table) in a microcontroller (using an EEPROM if it's a longer message than what the micro can hold) - but if you use a long messaage, make sure your audience are well trained in Morse.

The largest challenge I see is, that users may consider anything from a single cell to a 12V battery a valid battery, so, you need it to run as low as possible, while being able to handle serious over-voltage (a shunt regulator and a fairly high input impedance will go a long way to protect it).

Just wonder... Do geocachers run around with batteries in their pocket? Does anyone?

I'd consider a solar cell, perhaps with a super cap, as a supply, rather than relying on what your "customers" bring - and that way, you can seal the entire thing in clear(?) resin or epoxy.

Calculate a "worst case" on how often it will be needed for how long and you can make an educated estimate, on what you need in terms of power.

Have fun with it :)