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can control panel on my treadmill be deleted and a PWM fitted ? Answered

Hi all  i would like to build a 2x72  belt grind I have a old treadmill and have striped it down .I need help with deleting the main control panel and fitting a PWM if it can be done. I have bought a PWM but can't work out how to wire it up the PWM has power -and + and motor -and+ and where it needs to be wired in is in the first pic if you need more information please ask . any help would be great cheers Jason


mains is 240vac  the treadmill motor is 180vdc and the wiring in pic 1 is 12v DC

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Jack A Lopez

2 years ago

You know, for something like this, the speed sensor might not even be part of the motor drive circuits.

To say that another way, the speed sensor might not be part of a feedback loop for driving the motor.

Rather the signal from the speed sensor just goes to a some electronics that provide info to the user about speed, how fast he, or she, is running, plus accumulated distance, in miles, km, calories burned, etc.

Or at least that was true of the last treadmill I took apart.

Looking at the related panel, ----------------------->

I noticed some other authors have written some 'ibles that might be useful to you, particularly,

https://www.instructables.com/id/Use-a-Treadmill-DC...

and

https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Pottery-Wheel-...

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Downunder35mJack A Lopez

Answer 2 years ago

1+
The motor control itself is usually independent from the rest.
Usually there is a PWM or DC input somehwere to control the speed directly.
The feedback is for the electronics so you do your exercise correctly and won't fly off the thing.
So far all treadmills I salvaged used DC moors of 160 to 180V.
Means if in doubt you only need the DC part and can add an oversized circuit similar to what you find in an electric drill to regulate the speed.
If you only need full speed anyway you can connect the motor directly to the DC output and it will run but it might be a bit much in terms of starting current for the electronics.