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i keep seeing steampunk flair style things here and was wondering ... whats Steampunk? Answered

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triumphman

7 years ago

Hey, anyone see those awesome goggles that Johnny Depp used in Tim Burton's movie "Sleepy Hollow" ? I would love a pair, but really a "working pair". I can make them from my stuff I have in my stash. But I need some plans. Anyone can help me ? I have lenses, LED stuff, laser pen, glasses frames, brass sheets and rods, stainless steel sheets, leather, I'm ready to go. Help!

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TimTheScarecrow

9 years ago

ok. think victorian age but advanced. the fashion and for some people, life powered by steam and looking wicked awesome. steampunk is mainly an idea that the apocalypse happened in the 1800's and the style stayed the same but technology still progressed whilst running on steam. example- top hats, brass, leather, pipes, goggles. you get it?

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TimTheScarecrowTimTheScarecrow

Answer 9 years ago

a few movies and shows that should get you familiar with this would be Wild Wild West with Will Smith, Tim Burton's Sleepy Hollow, The Golden Compass, Disney's Treasure Planet, Disney's Pirates of the Carribean, The Illusionist, and The Rugrats episode "The Sky is Falling"

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ExtremeYoshiFanTimTheScarecrow

Answer 8 years ago

Wild Wild West was Practically the first true massive influence on steampunk in a movie, and the apocalypse description is a great way to describe steampunk.

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swolleneyeball

9 years ago

Steampunk was made from a person wishing to a gennie " i want a bowl of liquid awsume." the gennie granted it and the person took it to a junk yard and yelled " BE FREE!" and threw the liquid into the junk. and it all became shiny and brass and awsume. And so steampunk was born

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Kava

9 years ago

To misquote Peter Allen's lyrics, "Everything New is OLD Again". Transmogrification of modern objects, clothing et. al. (or ground-up fabrication of same) into perfectly functional, fully beautiful style pieces appearing to be from the Victorian/Edwardian era. The way things SHOULD be designed today but aren't. And yes, lots of metallics from the "dusky jewel" palette: bronze, (weathered) brass, pewter, etc.

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Kiteman

9 years ago

Think of it as trying to replicate modern devices as though they were invented as steam-powered devices, and then add some shiny brass bits.

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lemoniekelseymh

Answer 9 years ago

Aw come on I made an effort with this... L

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kelseymhlemonie

Answer 9 years ago

Argh. From the time stamps, you posted 10 minutes before me. But I *swear* that there were "0 answers" when I cut-and-pasted my annoyed reply. In any event, yours is better :-)

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lemoniekelseymh

Answer 9 years ago

Yes I know, I looked at the wikipedia article too, but discarded it for my own opinion. And while you're doing that someone else can be stuffing an answer in there... (it's happened to me) L

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lemonie

9 years ago

Generally it's making stuff that looks Steam Age. People take artistic licence with this, but it's an old-fashioned looking styling to create something that looks like it might be 100 years old. This isn't the same as antiques or reproductions, often the point is usually to give something new an old style, or otherwise make things that are ultra-retro.
See this Flickr set

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11010010110

9 years ago

attempt to make anything look like steam engine or similar device