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server problem Answered


i recently found a server in a trash bin wich works almost perfectly. there are two problems:
1)   the video port does not function
2)   you need a password to log into it.

so my questions are:
1)    does anyone know a company who makes pci ( and not VGA OR pci express) video cards
2)    does anyone know how to break through a password

thanks for responding!

Discussions

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Vyger

Best Answer 7 years ago

There are PCI video cards, There are AGP video cards and there are even some ISA video cards. (ISA was before PCI) I have a collection of all of them. How would you know it needs a password if you haven't gotten it to start up? It may not need one. Also a big factor is what OS its using. What does the sticker say, Windows NT? Server 2003?
First get it running and then move on to passwords.

The video on most servers is pretty poor because its very seldom used. Most of the time the monitors are turned off.

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didgitalpunkVyger

Answer 7 years ago

you can go see on server problem (update) for news about the damn thing( it still doesnt work)

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didgitalpunkVyger

Answer 7 years ago

Ho and are the isa ports black with big connections?

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didgitalpunkVyger

Answer 7 years ago

there is only one stocker winch says Intel inside xeon

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didgitalpunkVyger

Answer 7 years ago

i tryed to go onto it from my PC by a lan connexion it says it requires a password

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Vygerdidgitalpunk

Answer 7 years ago

Yes, that is as it should be. Access to it from the network is secure. However that is different than logging on to it as the user/administrator from its own login screen. Its just like you starting up your PC and logging on as opposed to a remote access of your computer. The in person user is a direct access and that account may not even have a password. It depends on the software. Server 2003 requires a password when it is set up. But depending on the OS you can get around those but you can't do it from a network access, you have to access it as a user.

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orksecurityVyger

Answer 7 years ago

Agreed, server displays are usually intended to be just good enough to configure/debug the machine.

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orksecurity

7 years ago

How do you know it works "almost perfectly" -- or at all -- if you can't see what's on the screen or log onto it from the network?

I'm not sure what you mean by "and not VGA". VGA describes either the resolution and display architecture, or (less formally) the video connection from the card to the monitor. Neither should matter much to you.

There used to be lots of plain PCI-bus video cards. These days your best bet would be to look for either the cheapest possible video card or a card rescued from an older machine, and then to check that those are indeed set up to work as basic PCI. Of course the challenge will be to get the appropriate drivers for the new display installed before you can see a display... but if it's a sufficiently simple card, it should at least come up in VGA resolution (640x480), which was pretty well standardized at the hardware level. If there's video on the motherboard, though, the server is likely to try to use that instead, so you may need to do some digging to find out if there's a way to disable it -- again, that would have to be done "blind", so you'd better hope there's a hardware jumper or that you can find enough documentation to navigate the BIOS setup screens without seeing them (NOT something I would want to try!)

If you can get video back: Whether you can break the password depends on how much of the machine's security is in hardware, what the operating system is, and how careful the prior owner was. Your best bet would be to wipe the machine and install an operating system from scratch. If the machine has hardware security features, you may have to replace the hard disk before you can do that. On the other hand, if it's just a simple Windows box with no hardware security and no encrypted disk, there are Linux-based boot disks which can wipe out the existing password; websearch will find them... but frankly I would STILL recommend wiping it and rebuilding it; you don't know how much of a virus/malware load it's carrying.

Generally, if it was trashed that means it is either very obsolete or has more wrong with it than was worth repairing. But it can't hurt to try. Good luck!

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didgitalpunkorksecurity

Answer 7 years ago

my school trashed a lot of things at this end of the year because it is expanding some of it's locals and with the server, they also trashed a computer wich works perfectly since i am using it at this moment( it's an axiomtek) and a rackable ups wich also work fine

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didgitalpunkorksecurity

Answer 7 years ago

since i live in france, some of the terms change, so VGA is the port made specially for video cards

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Vygerorksecurity

Answer 7 years ago

Wiping is a good idea, except that they will not have the software disks to reinstall. Server software is pretty pricey. If they want to use it to get a better understanding of a working server then they should keep the original software. I would use a second hard drive to install and experiment with and preserve the original disk for the moment.

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orksecurityVyger

Answer 7 years ago

Depends on what you want to do with the machine. Linux makes a fine server for most tasks; better than Windows for many.

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thegeekeorksecurity

Answer 7 years ago

Yes... I agree... Linux works pretty good on servers.

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orksecurityorksecurity

Answer 7 years ago

And agreed, even an ISA-bus video card -- the original VGA, for example -- would be sufficient to get the beast on the air. 640x480 is tiny by today's standards, but would be enough to get the machine limping along well enough to then install something better -- or to come in with a remote console set to higher resolution, or to fire up an FTP and SSH server and use those to configure it the rest of the way. (Which would be easier in Linux or Unix than in Windows -- Unix does have command-line ways to do everything, Windows doesn't necessarily.)

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Burf

7 years ago

Look for refurbished PCI video cards, I know Tiger Direct carries them, I assume there are other places that also do.
Wipe the hard drive and install Ubuntu Server Linux, i t works great, it handles Windows, Macs and Linux systems and it is free. Then you can set your own password.