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will this really regulate voltage? Answered

will this really regulate voltage?
I would think that voltage could just flow arround the caps

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/digital-electronics4.htm

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gmoon

9 years ago

There's at least one glaring error on that page: the voltage regulating circuit is connected directly to the transformer. Transformers don't have a + and - side; each side cycles between + and -.

There must be a rectifier between the transformer and the caps + regulator.

Looking at the preceding page, they do state: The transformer MUST produce DC voltage, but that's a contradiction in terms. Transformers are AC only devices. The page you link even goes as far to label inputs as "Positive from Transformer" and Negative from Transformer"...ooops.

They mean to say unregulated DC power supply, not transformer.

Other than that, it's correct. The caps act as reservoirs; storing enough current to remove or reduce any ripple in the supply voltage.

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Punkguytagmoon

Reply 9 years ago

What??? I thought they produced straight dc

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gmoonPunkguyta

Reply 9 years ago

Transformers are inductors, and only a changing magnetic field can "induce" current flow in a coil. So AC input is necessary (and produces AC output, too.)

When you think about, it makes sense. If a static magnetic field could create a flow of current, we would simply wrap wires around stationary permanent magnets and solve the world's energy problems.

But a generator requires a moving magnet, which is analogous to the moving magnetic field in a typical AC-driven transformer...

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lemonie

9 years ago

I don't see why not, the capacitors will store a bit of DC but they won't conduct it continuously. L