Tips and tricks for UV curing glue, resin and coatings

Only a few years ago your only option to repair certain plastics, glass or even a broken crystal was epoxy based resin or the good old superglue.You might have already tried one of the 5-seconds-repair pens or tried your own UV curing nail polish art at home.For the later you might be lucky as the resins used here are optimised for the purpose and lights you get with them.Sadly even the best nail polish is no substitude for a glue as the material properties need to be different.One of the most common complaints when it comes to using some UV glue, like Kafuter or similar is that it never comes with instructions.Sould be straight forward but it is not free of problems.For example almost all commercail UV curing glues that you can buy require quite stirct procedures and for the light the right wavelenth(s).Resins and coatings can be even more painful here as they might also require you to stick to the correct temperature.Let's start with one thing you might have encountered already...The glue is definately cured and rock hard but the surface tacky and smeary.Quite annoying if you want to fix a piece of jewellery and can't prevent it from collecting dirt and dust...The next thing you might have encountered is that despite having transparent materials it seems to be impossible to cure the clue.Both problems come down to wavelenght and exposure.UV curing glue is prevented from curing in the presence of oxygen - a factor utilised for example in resin based 3D printers.Uncovered glue is exposed to the oxygen in the air and won't cure easy.The glue or resin below this layer however with fully cure with ease in the absence of oxygen.For the second problem consider that not all materials that you can see through will let UVC light pass through ;)Bonding strenght is another complaint I hear a lot...Be aware that certain things just are no good for UV curing glues or resins.Take the molds you get for that purpose: on the material the glue won't bond!Teflon is another prime candidate here.But in a lot of cases it comes down to surface preparation.Don't be afriad to sand the surface!Not only will the surface area increase but the scratch marks will be invisible once filled anyways.Use sandpaper on your fingernails, then go over with clear nail polish -mirror finish ;)With curing often a problem consider to fully cover the glue.A bit of clear sticky tape, food wrapping foil....If that is not an option then eliminate the oxygen.You can use a container filled with inert (for the glue) gas like CO2 or just place a burning candle in it until it goes out....Either way the amount of oxygen should then be low enough to cure the surface of your glue.Not always is any of the above an option.Then you can still try more power and a lover wavelength.Mercury based lamps for example provide a very broad and powerful light that in most cases will cure within seconds.For a proper surface cure you need a wavelength of 265nm or lower.LED's offering this exist but at prices well out of range for the hobby user.A mercury lamp under high pressure is nothing for short term use and the limited lifespan does not always justify the costs of buying them.Like with most things in life certain inventions can have a dual purpose.Quality germicidal lamp systems for examples often state to go as low or even lower than 265nm.And they come at a fraction of the cost you have with a broadband mercury lamp.Even cheaper is the fre weather forecast.If the sun is siad to be strong enough so you need protection than even the worst glue will fully cure in seconds outside in the sun - tackfree!Don't be fooled and protect yourself!!These tiny LED lamps for your glue stick, the curing thingies for your nailpolish and everything else using UV light comes with warnings.For very good reasons!It might be hidden in the fineprint but you can not really see UV light.The blueish-purple glow you see is on the high end of what comes out and by that in the visible range of your eye.Just because a LED only gives a faint glow you see does not mean the UV light wouldn blind you if you could see it!Even worse for fluoroscent lamps or open cruning systems like those for your nailpolish.Reflected UV light is still UV light and you can still NOT see it!Stories of people getting sunburnt from germicidal lamps in a butcher shop or other people going blind from checking money as their living have a true base...In most cases lamps used well past their lifespan or simply the wrong type of lamp but still: the damage came from UVC light...If you just love creating your own artwork or jewellery with UV curing resins and glues than protect yourself.Proper sunglasses with a stated UV protection for example or just black nitrile gloves for your hands...

Topic by Downunder35m 


Floppy disk Welding Goggles

The new MacGyver used floppy disks as welding eye protection. I recently found a floppy, and tore it apart. It seems to be a very dark filter, but does it filter UV?

Question by Toga_Dan   |  last reply


How to make florescent ink?

I have Googled and searched Wiki on how to make fluorescent (ultraviolet) inks. I want to know how to make them. I dont want th lemon juice , corn starch, milk or other types of invisible inks. I want to make the stuff the glows under uv light. I searched using uv, ultraviolet, fluorescent inks but couldnt find anything other than the lemon juice and other types of "invisible" writing. Please help if you know where to find or if you know how to make fluorescent (ultraviolet) inks. You can email me at whitethatchpotentloins@yahoo.com I mean the inks that u can buy for handstampers and that are put in invisible ink markers. I want to make the stuff myself and not have to buy it off the internet.... So while yes there are alot of things that glow under UV, I want it in liquid form.

Topic by WhiteThatch   |  last reply


Help Needed, 3D Printing Via Electroplating

A few years ago I saw a 3D printer that printed using UV reactive resin and a DLP projector and I obviously started thinking about ways to make this for myself. Recently I have been entertaining the idea of repurposing the old CRT technology with phosphors that produce UV light to replace expensive DLP projectors but I couldn't think of an easy way to do that. I was fiddling with various ways of repurposing one of my old CRT monitors when I had a decent idea. Instead of converting electron beams into light to harden resin why don't we harness the electron beams for the purpose of electroplating! Instead of resin we could use an ion solution and build models out of metal! Of course we would still need to replace the phosphors embedded glass screen with a conductive plate to serve as a non-consumable anode. Unfortunately I do not have the time or resources to do this myself so I wanted to post this to the Instructables Community and see If anyone felt this was a worthwhile project.  Please let me know what you think of the idea! I would love to see this turn into an actual project.

Topic by gooeyideas   |  last reply


White walls yellowing

Right so i cleaned off my white walls last night with some lava soap and purple power cleaner degreaser and scrub brush but i noticed they have a light browning effect not sure if that UV damage or some other type of oxidation.   ive checked around the interwebs and the only things i can come up with are  island girl sea glow,  bleche white and brillo pads with magic erasers am i stuck with the yellow??  ive only had these white walls since agust

Topic by Malhecho   |  last reply


Who I can unclored plastic, colored in the mass

Hi all ! I want uncolored plastic, or uncolored latex, and I need to know how it's possible. For have light color, pastel color. Like nightblue => lightblue. It's used for cleaning old yellow plastic, like old white or grey computers or consoles, but it's maybe only for have the origin color, not for uncolored the color in the mass. It's yellow because the plastic is oxyded. With hydrogen peroxyde + UV. So, do you know if this combo is good for my project ? Or who I can make it ? It's for custom parts. With many friction, and it's bad to use paint for that. Hope yoou help me, see you soon. Thanks in advance.

Topic by Brolock   |  last reply


Carbon Button Lamp

The Nikola Tesla group forum is asking for new projects, so I'm posting this as a suggestion. I would love to build it myself, but I lack the tools and money. This is my first contribution to Instructables, so please comment constructively. Nikola Tesla invented the Carbon Button lamp as a kind of incandescent light, because Thomas Edison banned him from using his incandescent filament bulbs. Nikola later discovered that versions of it could also be used in wireless, trans-Atlantic telegraphy, and to investigate what we now call x rays. In fact, he even used the lamp (or something similar to it) to take x-ray photographs, 8 years before Wilhelm Rotgen discovered them.For this reason, I must warn you: this device may possibly generate x rays. I am not responsible for any harm of any kind that may or may not result from re-creating this interesting device. There are phosphors that you can buy that will absorb x rays and re-emit them as visible light. I recommend that you coat the bulb with it until you know for sure that the x rays aren't strong enough to hurt you, or if makes x rays at all. Mixing it with a phosphor made for uv light wouldn't hurt either. Theory of Operation:The bulb is powered by a Tesla Coil, or other source of high voltage, high frequency current, such as a driver for a plasma globe (actually, the modern plasma globe is descended from this kind of technology!)When the power is turned on, electricity bombards the carbon button. Because carbon isn't the best conductor, this causes the button to heat and release electrons into the bulb's vacuum (the technical name for this is "thermionic emission," or the "Edison effect") . These electrons, in turn, excite the remaining air molecules and cause them to create visible light. This is strikingly similar to how fluorescent lamps work!Supposedly, the bulb should shine 10 times brighter than an incandescent bulb.(Note that the excitation of the air molecules, not the incandescence of the button, is actually the main source of light from the bulb.)If anyone decides to build it, please post an instructable showing the steps and finished product. I suggest you get started by reading the patent, number 514,170. You may also want to read part of Tesla's lecture, "Experiments with Alternate Currents of High Potential and High Frequency."To anyone who will attempt this, I wish you good luck!

Topic by ElectricUmbrella   |  last reply


Carbon Button Lamp

The Nikola Tesla group forum is asking for new projects, so I'm posting this as a suggestion. I would love to build it myself, but I lack the tools and money. This is my first contribution to Instructables, so please comment constructively.Nikola Tesla invented the Carbon Button lamp as a kind of incandescent light, because Thomas Edison banned him from using his incandescent filament bulbs. Nikola later discovered that versions of it could also be used in wireless, trans-Atlantic telegraphy, and to investigate what we now call x rays. In fact, he even used the lamp (or something similar to it) to take x-ray photographs, 8 years before Wilhelm Rotgen discovered them.For this reason, I must warn you: this device may possibly generate x rays. I am not responsible for any harm of any kind that may or may not result from re-creating this interesting device.There are phosphors that you can buy that will absorb x rays and re-emit them as visible light. I recommend that you coat the bulb with it until you know for sure that the x rays aren't strong enough to hurt you, or if makes x rays at all. Mixing it with a phosphor made for uv light wouldn't hurt either.Theory of Operation:The bulb is powered by a Tesla Coil, or other source of high voltage, high frequency current, such as a driver for a plasma globe (actually, the modern plasma globe is descended from this kind of technology!)When the power is turned on, electricity bombards the carbon button. Because carbon isn't the best conductor, this causes the button to heat and release electrons into the bulb's vacuum (the technical name for this is "thermionic emission," or the "Edison effect") . These electrons, in turn, excite the remaining air molecules and cause them to create visible light. This is strikingly similar to how fluorescent lamps work!Supposedly, the bulb should shine 10 times brighter than an incandescent bulb.(Note that the excitation of the air molecules, not the incandescence of the button, is actually the main source of light from the bulb.)If anyone decides to build it, please post an instructable showing the steps and finished product. I suggest you get started by reading the patent, number 514,170. You may also want to read part of Tesla's lecture, "Experiments with Alternate Currents of High Potential and High Frequency."To anyone who will attempt this, I wish you good luck!Patent: http://www.google.com/patents?id=UpldAAAAEBAJ&pg;=PA1&dq;=514,170+tesla&source;=gbs_selected_pages&cad;=0_1Lecture: http://www.tfcbooks.com/tesla/1892-02-03.htmQuestions:What can one use for the carbon button?Could one use a modern, hollowed-out light bulb for this? (I would think there would be some problems with sealing the globe, and with the stem.)Edit: I recently found the third picture in Tesla's Colorado Springs notes and his "apparatus for the utilization of radiant energy" patent. It must be the single-electrode x ray tube I was talking about before...

Topic by ElectricUmbrella   |  last reply