Solar??? Batteries??? controller???

I want to get these 12v solar battery chargers they come with alligator clamps to hook to the battery. i want to get enough for around 150 volts so how would i hook the solar panels in series, and do i need a controller for each battery? and how would i rig that up and how can I get it going into all the 12 volt batteries without any damage to the batteries etc. And can this be done for less than $400 if the solar panels are $30 each and the batteries are $14 each. THANK YOU!!!!  THANK YOU!!!!  THANK YOU!!!!  THANK YOU!!!!  THANK YOU!!!! oh and could you give me links for all the stuff I'm gonna be buying. THANKS!!!!  

Question by jimmerforpoy   |  last reply


Managing high-voltage lithium-ion batteries in HEVs

From EDN (Electronic Design News), comes this article: Skyrocketing energy prices and the growing concern over carbon emissions have focused attention on electric and hybrid-electric vehicles. New lithium-battery designs will be key technologies for efficient EVs and HEVs.By Michael Kultgen, Linear Technology Corp -- EDN, 4/9/2009Safely getting the most energy and lifetime from a lithium cell requires some sophisticated electronics. One requirement, for example, is the ability to measure the voltage across every 3.7V battery cell in a stack of 100 series-connected cells. How do you cope with the 370V of common-mode voltage and reject 100V of common-mode switching transients? The design of battery-management systems for EV (electric-vehicle), HEV (hybrid-electric-vehicle), and UPS (uninterruptible-power-supply) applications requires solving many such problems.How do batteries make cars "green," ...http://www.edn.com/article/CA6648791.html?nid=2432&rid;=8848980

Topic by Goodhart 


Swapping out a lead acid electric bike battery for a Lithium Ion one.

Hi folks. I have a fairly old but still quite serviceable Thompson Euro Classic electric bike that runs on a 36v lead acid electric battery pack with a brushless motor. I've just been offered a 36v lithium ion bike battery that I would love to use but I'm not too sure if it would be the right choice, my main reason for the change is simply weight consideration, the current battery pack comprises of three 12v batteries and weighs in at a hefty 28lb the replacement weighs a little under 4lb, this would very obviously make quite a difference in the bikes 87lb overall weight. However weight isn't the only consideration, I would like to extend the range of my bike and with a little work and some suitable wiring and a couple of switches I could quite easily use the battery as a second power source for longer rides, I fitted a large plastic  tool box onto a rear carrier when I first bought the bike which would easily accommodate the battery or I could possibly even add an external carrier for it behind the seat, the current battery is good for around fifteen to twenty miles depending on how many hills I hit & how much I feel like pedalling, I hoping that an additional battery would double the range meaning I could rely on it to visit nearby towns without having to worry about finding somewhere I can give the battery a booster charge. My main worry is about damage to the motor, I know very little about electric bike motors and having read so many stories about these batteries suffering from overheating problems and even catching fire I am more than a little concerned I could damage to my only transport, I usually ride motorcycles but thanks to a couple of health issues I'm currently grounded so apart from walking which can be pretty limiting this bike is my only way to get around without spending a fortune on public transport I'm looking for advice from people who know about electric bikes and their motors who could give me some simple advice in layman's terms on how to proceed, please don't blind me with all sorts of technical jargon as it really wouldn't help, I'm not stupid it just isn't my field of expertise. Thanks in advance for your help. NG.

Topic by Nostalgic Guy   |  last reply


I want to run my 12 volt power tools ( ridgid ) using a 12 volt lead acid battery

I have been doing this for years and I finally found this line of tools that is small and compact and the battery fits in the handle and it has tons of power  the lithium ion 12 v ridgid drill and job max line. I tried to wire up the tools contacts to the small lead acid batteries I normally use and even a full size car battery but it failed to power tool because there is this small contact that the tool is requiring which the lithium battery has but obviously the lead acid does not.  I do this for heavy duty use such as continual sawing and sanding and things like that.  any suggestions I really need to make this work as I run a mobile business.  I am looking for a solution to over riding the need for that extra contact and I am fully aware that I will void the warranty as many of you may be thinking. Please help 

Question by captainj954   |  last reply


Electric bike from spare motors

Hi Everyone, my first post here.  I've been thinking of making an electric bike. Now there are bikes on the market that are $450+ and I have a spare one that I haven't touched in over 6 years lying around. With the recent improvements in DC electric motors, I think it's about time I gave it a shot at assembling an electric bike. The motor will likely come from an electric lawn mower, the battery will be a lithium ion battery rated for that motor (I can attach these into series or parallel depending on what motor I use). I've been looking at electric motors from Kogan.com.au (I'm australian)  Either one of these http://www.kogan.com/au/buy/18v-lithium-ion-cordless-garden-tool-set-3-piece-set/ or http://www.kogan.com/au/buy/recharge-mower-electric-lawn-mower The cheaper one more likely. If I should source a motor another way then I'm all ears.  My questions are: Would the motors in the first link be powerful enough (they use the same battery as an electric drill) How would I attach the motor to the bike so that I can ride and engage the engine when I want? How would I mount it so that I can use regenerative braking? I was thinking of using a clutch sort of mechanism attached to the wheel axle, again I'm all ears. And if anyone's done this already, what type of hazards am I going to face? (that probably aren't obvious, safety first!) I also thought of using a petrol engine from a lawn mower but an electric bike seems more appealing to me. :) Thanks all

Topic by majuules 


Toyota Will Offer a Plug-In Hybrid by 2010

If you make it, they will come. Or something.CalCars, the California Cars Initiative, has not only been campaigning for plug-in hybrid vehicles, they were the first to build a plug-in Toyota Prius. CalCars longstanding, and really quite simple, thesis is that plug-in hybrids can achieve 100+ MPG using today's technology:We promote plug-in hybrids (PHEVs). PHEVs are like regular hybrids but with larger batteries and the ability to re-charge from a standard outlet (mostly at night). They're the best of both worlds: local travel is electric, and you always have a gas-tank backup. More details here.Toyota seems to have finally received the message, now pledging to offer a plug-in hybrid by 2010: Toyota Will Offer a Plug-In Hybrid by 2010 (NYT). From the article:DETROIT -- The Toyota Motor Corporation, which leads the world's automakers in sales of hybrid-electric vehicles, announced Sunday night that it would build its first plug-in hybrid by 2010.The move puts Toyota in direct competition with General Motors, which has announced plans to sell its own plug-in hybrid vehicle, the Chevrolet Volt, sometime around 2010.Katsuaki Watanabe, the president of Toyota, announced the company's plans at the Detroit auto show as part of a series of environmental steps.Mr. Watanabe said Toyota, best known for its Prius hybrid car, would develop a fleet of plug-in hybrids that run on lithium-ion batteries, instead of the nickel-metal hydride batteries that power the Prius and other Toyota models.Plug-in hybrids differ from the current hybrid vehicles in that they can be recharged externally, from an ordinary power outlet. In a conventional hybrid the battery is recharged from power generated by its wheels.Mr. Watanabe said the lithium-ion fleet would be made available first to Toyota's commercial customers around the world, like government agencies and corporations, including some in the United States. He did not say when they would be available to consumers.Another case of hackers' solutions becoming mainstream? Definitely!

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Hybrid electric vehicals, batteries going serial or parallel

Can I wire 7000 lithium ion battery cells (about 75kwh) in parallel, and then use a lightweight bike engine hooked to a DC generator and connected in series to the batteries to boost voltage? Are there any flows in this design concept, for use in a hybrid race vehicle to increase the longevity of the batteries?I am trying to develop a race track car which is hybrid, thus utilizing electric motors immense torque.We build original race cars with common petrol engines but now I’m seriously thinking of developing a next generation race car. I know batteries don’t last long in high drain situations and thus any race car I sell will need a battery replacement after a race season. I’m sure this will be bad for business. Thus this is why I’m thinking of ideas to prolong the battery life by reducing current drainage. That’s why I want to have an engine generator with its sole purpose is just to boost voltage, and about 20,000ah worth of batteries connected in parallel so I reduce current demand per battery cell to well under 1C. Giving a Tesla p100d as an example I would require about 1200 amps and 400 volts to produce 480kw of power. If wire all 7000 battery cells in parallel to produce the same amount of current then each cell will need to provide about 0.18amps that’s very low to sustain longevity of the batteries. The generator is then connected in series to help boost the system voltage to 400vIn extrem simple terms, (the batteries provide the current, and the engine generator provides the voltage)I hope you understand why I’m looking at it this way. I know it might not be the most efficient way, but is it a practical doable way? Thanks

Topic by SamA196   |  last reply


Can I use a bunch of AA Batteries setup in cells in place of a deep cycle battery for green power storage? Answered

Hello, I have been looking more and more into solar and wind power generation as well as ways to store the power. I am still in the planning stages and have not yet tested anything. What I usually see in almost every green power storage guide is to use deep cycle batteries mostly of the types designed for solar, golf carts, etc. That would work fine but they are always rather expensive atleast any I have found online (if you know a cheaper source I would love to hear about it). So my question is this could I just buy a bulk quantity of AA NiMH (the new ones without memory) or AA Lithium ion batteries and set them up in series to make cells of 8x AA per cell for 12v total then connect all cells in parallel for my battery bank? I am not sure if this would actually be more expensive as it is just an idea I had and have been unable to find someone that tried it (perhaps I am searching for the wrong thing). It seems to me this could be more effective as I could replace one battery in the cell when it goes out and be able to constantly repair the cells in that manner. Has anyone tried this and does it work? Would it require a special charge controller unlike the usual ones sold for solar? If anyone knows of any guides that show this please share them as I would love to do more research on this before I make a decision. I think I saw once on some show that the electric car they showed was setup in this way. Anyway thank you for your assistance it is greatly appreciated!

Question by TiamatStudios   |  last reply