What is this? For polishing? Answered

Anyone know what this is? I'm guessing that it's supposed to be powered by a drill and used with buffing compound for polishing. Thanks! Pictures: 

Question by Yonatan24   |  last reply


French polishing a turned item.? Answered

Hello, How would I go about french polishing a turned item. The problem associated with it is that the sanding and polishing (assuming I polish on the lathe) will both be accross the grain which is generally considered the less preferable option. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Question by alexhalford   |  last reply


Differents polishers in Dremel set. What to use? Answered

I use a Dremel-clone, and it has two kind of polishers; the white felt ones and this two other type: Looks like hard rubber, and I used it to burnish steel to clean some grinding marks. It works, but I'm not sure: 1 - Must I use the  polishing powder like with the felt ones? 2 - Why they have two colors, green and blue? Have they different hardness? Thanks for your time!

Question by infob   |  last reply


Rock tumbling, is there an economical substitution for grit & polish? .

I have vibrating & rotary tumblers. The commercial grit & polish I've been using, comes in a 4 step process. Is there a homemade grit or other options for tumbling rocks & gems?    Thank you

Question by Jolieblnde   |  last reply


How and what Powder to Polish Rock containing Agate or Quartz

Got this lucky wreck for $350 and a month of work later is fully refurbished running  smoothly .. I can hand shape ( grind ) Quartz and Agate to pleasing shapes. I can't use Tumble polish because it destroys the shape. Please help me understand what powder like talc etc should I use on the leather spinner polish wheel to shine my art stones like semiprecious stones in a store ??

Question by iceng   |  last reply


Low friction "bearings"

For several of my projects I required some sort of bearing that would not only allow for a minimised free play but also very low friction.Before you get too exited: This is not a new type of bearing or anthing for heavy duty loads, not even for ongoing use without servicing.I found that even slightly heavier things rotated on makishift bearing far easier if the axle was verticall instead of horizontally.This gave me the idea to try a simple needle-bearing approach.This is how it goes:1. Grind and polish your axle to get a nice needle point - it must be perfectly centered!I prefer to do this with the axle in a fast spinning drill on a fine grinder.The polishing in a simlilar way, but please do not try it with a cloth in your hand on a spinning axle!2. The other part of the bearing is a screw or pin with a punch mark.I grinded and polished a punch for this so it has an angle of 60° and polished it to a mirror finnish.If alignment is of importance then of course the pin/screw must work for this purpose!If in doubt make it spind an use a pencil to get the true center.A drop of sewing machine oil and it spins nice and with very little friction.The key is to adjust the gap(s) between axle and punch mark to next to nothing.You don't want any pressure along the axle as you would "drill" a hole into your mounts.And you don't want it too loose to avoid wobble.I hope it might give you an idea for your next project.

Topic by Downunder35m 


How to polish/buff polycarbonate (lexan) on roughly cut edge? Answered

I'm not talking about minor scratches. I would like to polish 1/2" thick cube that I cut out with table saw, it's not transparent at all on the edges (due to rough cut), but I'd like it to be :)  Can I do it with some kind of Dremel attachment?

Question by bratan   |  last reply


Tips and tricks for UV curing glue, resin and coatings

Only a few years ago your only option to repair certain plastics, glass or even a broken crystal was epoxy based resin or the good old superglue.You might have already tried one of the 5-seconds-repair pens or tried your own UV curing nail polish art at home.For the later you might be lucky as the resins used here are optimised for the purpose and lights you get with them.Sadly even the best nail polish is no substitude for a glue as the material properties need to be different.One of the most common complaints when it comes to using some UV glue, like Kafuter or similar is that it never comes with instructions.Sould be straight forward but it is not free of problems.For example almost all commercail UV curing glues that you can buy require quite stirct procedures and for the light the right wavelenth(s).Resins and coatings can be even more painful here as they might also require you to stick to the correct temperature.Let's start with one thing you might have encountered already...The glue is definately cured and rock hard but the surface tacky and smeary.Quite annoying if you want to fix a piece of jewellery and can't prevent it from collecting dirt and dust...The next thing you might have encountered is that despite having transparent materials it seems to be impossible to cure the clue.Both problems come down to wavelenght and exposure.UV curing glue is prevented from curing in the presence of oxygen - a factor utilised for example in resin based 3D printers.Uncovered glue is exposed to the oxygen in the air and won't cure easy.The glue or resin below this layer however with fully cure with ease in the absence of oxygen.For the second problem consider that not all materials that you can see through will let UVC light pass through ;)Bonding strenght is another complaint I hear a lot...Be aware that certain things just are no good for UV curing glues or resins.Take the molds you get for that purpose: on the material the glue won't bond!Teflon is another prime candidate here.But in a lot of cases it comes down to surface preparation.Don't be afriad to sand the surface!Not only will the surface area increase but the scratch marks will be invisible once filled anyways.Use sandpaper on your fingernails, then go over with clear nail polish -mirror finish ;)With curing often a problem consider to fully cover the glue.A bit of clear sticky tape, food wrapping foil....If that is not an option then eliminate the oxygen.You can use a container filled with inert (for the glue) gas like CO2 or just place a burning candle in it until it goes out....Either way the amount of oxygen should then be low enough to cure the surface of your glue.Not always is any of the above an option.Then you can still try more power and a lover wavelength.Mercury based lamps for example provide a very broad and powerful light that in most cases will cure within seconds.For a proper surface cure you need a wavelength of 265nm or lower.LED's offering this exist but at prices well out of range for the hobby user.A mercury lamp under high pressure is nothing for short term use and the limited lifespan does not always justify the costs of buying them.Like with most things in life certain inventions can have a dual purpose.Quality germicidal lamp systems for examples often state to go as low or even lower than 265nm.And they come at a fraction of the cost you have with a broadband mercury lamp.Even cheaper is the fre weather forecast.If the sun is siad to be strong enough so you need protection than even the worst glue will fully cure in seconds outside in the sun - tackfree!Don't be fooled and protect yourself!!These tiny LED lamps for your glue stick, the curing thingies for your nailpolish and everything else using UV light comes with warnings.For very good reasons!It might be hidden in the fineprint but you can not really see UV light.The blueish-purple glow you see is on the high end of what comes out and by that in the visible range of your eye.Just because a LED only gives a faint glow you see does not mean the UV light wouldn blind you if you could see it!Even worse for fluoroscent lamps or open cruning systems like those for your nailpolish.Reflected UV light is still UV light and you can still NOT see it!Stories of people getting sunburnt from germicidal lamps in a butcher shop or other people going blind from checking money as their living have a true base...In most cases lamps used well past their lifespan or simply the wrong type of lamp but still: the damage came from UVC light...If you just love creating your own artwork or jewellery with UV curing resins and glues than protect yourself.Proper sunglasses with a stated UV protection for example or just black nitrile gloves for your hands...

Topic by Downunder35m 


whats the best way to care for scratched chrome on a motorbike? Answered

had my first fall today :( ended up scratching the exhaust...whats the best way to clean it up? im riding a yamaha xvs dragstar any additional information such as best way to keep the bike buffed/polished and generally clean and rust free will be much apreciated thanks

Question by dubpunkdub   |  last reply


Lacquer/Enamel for Brass? Answered

Hey I'm looking for a clear, tough coating for polished brass, to stop it from tarnishing. Initially I thought clear nail polish would do the trick, but it turns out it's not as tough as I thought... it'll rub off in places within about a month, from what I'm planning to do with it. Could anyone else give me a few suggestions/links as to what I can buy/use along these lines? Thanks

Question by .Unknown.   |  last reply


Headlight Restoration on the cheap.

How to restore your dull plastic headlamps to like new, for about $4.00 (if your lamps are dirty on the inside, that is a whole other instructable): Step 1 - Wash the headlamps with common dish soap and allow to dry thoroughly, this will remove the dirt and oils from the lamp. Step 2 - Using regular rubbing compound or silver polish (I used Silvo brand silver polish (about $4.00 a can here in Canada), it may work with copper polish as well) Apply a small amount of compound or polish using a soft cotton cloth (an old t-shirt or sheet cut into manageable size) gently rub the lamp in a circular motion (the amount of pressure is determined by the severity of the dullness, you may need to repeat the procedure more than once) allow the polish or rubbing compound to dry to a haze, usually by the time your done both lamps the first one will be ready to perform the next step. Step 3 - Using a clean dry cotton cloth buff the lens to remove all of the haze, if the lamp still looks dull repeat step 2. Step 4 - Once you are satisfied that the lenses are as polished as they will get, wax both lamps with a high quality auto wax, (a wax containing carnuba is the best) Mother's or Maguires works great. The wax will prevent bugs, dust and dirt from sticking to the lamp and it will retain it's clarity for a long time, if the lamp starts to look dull simply apply a new coat of wax. Step 5 - Stand back and admire your newly restored headlamps - you will be amazed at how much further you can see at night. *The attached photo is of my headlamp on my 1998 Suzuki Esteem - The before picture is from another 1998 Suzuki Esteem, my lamps were almost as bad as the one pictured here.

Topic by DELETED_Silent Ninja Bunny   |  last reply


Etching a knife blade?

I am concerning etching a knife blade, by using nail polish (or something) to cover the part of the blade I do not want etched and raw  muriatic acid to etch with.  Anyone got any suggestions or recommendations.  

Question by WazIt   |  last reply


what is the best way i can clean my motorbike at a reasonable price?

I have a yamaha xvs dragstar, this is my first bike and it would be very helpfull if someone could tell me the basics for cleaning my bike. the best way to describe my bike is a crome armchair (just to give you an idea of what kinda cleaning i need to be doing) i have a "buffering/polishing towle" i'v read that hosing the bike down to remove excess dirt is a good idea...am i right in thinking so? am i ok using soapy water or should i fork out and get some foam/gunge/spray? any help is much appreciated thanks

Question by dubpunkdub   |  last reply


The geek daily Scheduel. <--- i hope i spelt that right, otherwise i'de be a geek castaway.

What Geeks do every day.7:00 AM= Wake up and brush teeth, then polish braces. (LOL)8:00 AM= After hour long brace polishing we eat a healthy fiber filled breakfast.8:30 AM= Leave for school. We like to be early.12:00PM= Talk to friends about Conquer.3:00 PM= After school, run away from bullies, all the way home.3:45 PM= At home, play Conquer.3:46 PM= Live Conquer.4:00 PM= Start doing homework.7:00 PM= Finish homework and study8:00 PM= Eat dinner then sleep instantly. Repeat every day, any day.

Topic by kingghaffari   |  last reply


Is this 4-Sided Diamond Hone Block any good? Answered

4-Sided Diamond Hone Block  I was wondering if it would be a  good idea to use this to polish up my katana that I'm building. I already have a whet stone but it powders easily and seems  to not be able to handle the job. also it takes forever i want something with a lower grit.

Question by the_burrito_master   |  last reply


How to remove the metal in a CD or a DVD in a simple and ecofriendly way? I want to use the clear plastic.

I would like to upcycle the clear plastic  (polycarbonate) in CDs and DVDs to Make all sort of things like smartphone supports, boxes, structres, and so on. I have already bent, cut, polish the plastic by I haven't found a satisfactory way to remove the metalic layer. Thaks to you all. 

Question by gserrano701   |  last reply


Hi I have black and white photos on bottlecaps and after A couple weeks, they are yellowing and getting dull.

Also Have had some issues with Black and white pictures yellowing also. I have used clear nail polish to seal also have tried Modge Podge and glue.....then  modge podge on one triple thick on another and 3d laquer on another....No matter what they dull after a couple of weeks...as A pendant. And the photo turns yellow.What to do???? Thanks Tara Rose

Question by tarakruegerrose   |  last reply


Guitar Finish? Answered

Hello, I am finishing my electric guitar, and i wet sanded and everything, and i heard rumors that you use rubbing compound on the last bit to get it to look good. In the instructable by Gmoon, applying a mirror finish (by hand), it says that he used Rubbing compound, but people keep saying, "I think you mean POLISHING compound....", and i don't know which one to use. I have the guitar all dull looking from wet sanding, and i just need it shiny. What is your outlook on this? Thank you

Question by ski4jesus   |  last reply


I want to make a life-sized model of Sputnik. Answered

The original Sputnik looked really slick and threatening! I want one! Unfortunately, the original is unavailable, so I'll have to settle for something more modest. The original Sputnik looked like the one in the picture. My goal is to make a model that is life-sized and pretty good looking. Coolness is paramount; precision and accuracy are not. Does anyone have ideas about how to make the sphere part easily? The criteria for my model sphere is that it needs to be:     Roughly 60cm in diameter (I believe the original was ~58cm)     Strong and rigid enough that I can attach the four antennas     Light enough that I can hang it from my ceiling     It is okay to be a little rough (i.e. it doesn't need to be polished steel or whatever) Right now I'm thinking I should get a bunch of pieces of hard-cell foam, stack and glue them, and carve a sphere. Then I'll sand it smooth and spray paint it silver. Is this a good approach? Any other ideas for the project?

Question by mtdna   |  last reply


Scratched glass fixes? I accidentally scratched the mirrors in my bathroom when sanding the frame. Can this be fixed?

I was in the process of sanding down the wooden frames of my bathroom mirrors preparatory to refinishing them, and I didn't take the mirrors out first (duh!) Anyway, I was using 40 grit sandpaper, because the wood was pretty badly damaged from years of use without proper care, and ended up with some deep and ugly scratches in the glass. Biggest problem is that I'm just renting, so I'd really like to fix the problem before it is noticed by the owner, and having the mirrors replaced would be a financial pain in the neck, to say the least. So, does anybody have any ideas about fixing the scratches? Can I do something like I would with wood, using finer sandpaper in sequence, or will I just have more scratches of varying width and depth? How about buffing or polishing with or without some sort of filler?

Question by artisandyke   |  last reply


mission of sputnik 1

Russian technology satellite. One launch, 1957.10.04. Tikhonravov's 1.4 metric ton ISZ satellite was to have been launched by the new R-7 ICBM as the Soviet Union's first satellite, during the International Geophysical Year.    But it was not ready in time, so Korolev hurriedly developed Sputnik 1 as a replacement. It became the first artificial satellite of the earth. Sputnik 1 had 1 watt of power, producing an 0.4 second duration signal on the 7 and 15 m bands. Four antennae were deployed at 35 degree angles. Power was provided by three silver-zinc batteries. Thermo-regulation was by a ventilator. The 580 mm sphere had a mass of 83 kg and was made of highly polished Aluminum AMG6T alloy 2 mm thick. It was built without drawings due to the quick time schedule. Korolev was everywhere, supervising all aspects of its construction. It functioned for 21 days.      AKA: PS-1. Gross mass: 84 kg (185 lb). First date: 1957-10-04. Number: 1 .     the word sputnik is russian word for traveller

Topic by Waren-Neutron   |  last reply


Strengthen plaster of paris with Christmas tinsel?

Through the Answers section here, I learned of mixing borax, rebake into powder, and then mix alum to create a high polishable cast...and also read discussion of the use of horse hair or fiberglass fibers from insulation for reinforcing the plaster. Unfortunately, I haven't ever found enough details to test either of these methods. The other day at the store, my wife asked if tinsel would work. It never occurred to me, but it sounds like it would make sense. Have you ever tried to pull a strand of that stuff a part? Also, I'm sure right after Christmas, it would be dirt cheap and in vast supply. I have been using the plaster of paris for making mold for some Sugru/Oogoo projects. Anyone ever try this or have any suggestions? Or if anyone knowledge about the fiberglass thing that I can use as basis, that would be cool too. Also, I know there are better materials than plaster of paris, that are stronger and all, but I am trying to at least use what I have on hand first, and I know other people would find it useful too.

Question by vphreeze   |  last reply


Alternatives to 3d printing for electric violin?

So I have this project that I've really been wanting to start for a while now. Essentially, I'd like to 3d scan one of these: http://musiciansupply.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/zeta-violin-sold-550x280.jpg ...and then have it fabricated with my own customizations implemented. The reason I chose to go the scanner route is because I know nothing about woodworking and I really like this design. I'd like to make some custom modifications to the body on the computer and then have the 3d file fabricated somehow. My question is, are there any good alternatives for fabrication for such replication? I think CNC might be an option, but if I go that route I would assume I couldn't make the instrument hollow. The reason I dont want to do 3d printing is because I want the violin to be made out of 1 solid piece of material which would require a huge build volume, I cant afford a printer like that. Also the prints require too much post production and I want something really polished and professional looking. It it turns out well I plan to make a few of them. I have the electronics already taken care of I just no nothing about instrument making... if anyone could shoot some ideas at me that would be great!

Topic by jd'alessandro   |  last reply


Any of you more seasoned build-o-philes have tips, mods, or tricks for an 8"(or any size) drill press? Answered

I was recently given a very well taken care of 8" Craftsman 1/3hp 5 speed drill press. It works fine, but it's a little grimy. So I'm currently cleaning it. Actually I wanted to ask someone if it's okay to clean that gunky layer of grease off of it because the grime has mixed in and it's essentially "sanding" the post. If it IS okay to clean off, do I replace it with different or newer grease once it's been cleaned? Also, ever since I was a kid, I was captivated by the swirling grinder or polisher pattern on the drill press table. Mine has a thin layer of rust on the table. Is there any way to remove the rust without ruining my beloved swirly pattern? So to wrap up here is the list of questions... 1. What are some modifications, tips, tricks, jigs, etc. for an 8" Benchtop Drill Press? 2. Is it okay to clean the grease off of the entire machine? If so, do I regrease it afterwards? What's the best product to use? 3. Is there a way to remove small layer of rust off the table without compromising the original swirl pattern? ANY and ALL help or suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Thank you Instructables community!!(That made me think of a town whose entire population was comprised of Instructables members. Ha! Got a question about robots? Go to Ted's three doors down. Building a welder from car batteries? Oh Tom two streets over would be more than happy to help! I know...ridiculous.)

Question by Mister Wolf   |  last reply


Sharpening a concave blades like Kukri or similar

Every now and then you have someone approaching with the odd job.This time it was in the form of an old Kukri / Gurkha knife.Wasn't expecting this when I was asked a few days ago if I could sharpen some old knife so it can be used for camping.The knife had a few marks from hitting hard stuff or maybe the occasional nail.But the worst was that for as long as guy had that knife it was only "sharpened" using a belt sander.You know, these tiny machines advertised to give your (kitchen-) knife the perfect edge.We could now argue about the pros and cons of having a knife edge that is literally rounded.But once it was done so many times that the edge really looks rounded it becomes obvious why this method only works for thinner blades.Adding to the problem was the fact that the belt used was just over 1.5cm wide.Appereantly so it is easier to do the concave part of the blade.Lets just say lengthwise it looked like someone created a wave pattern LOLThere was nothing "straight" on this nice blade anymore.Now, if you look up how to properly sharpen thise Kukri knifes then you can find all sorts of really useful tips.One I really likes was to use some eraser and toglue sandpaper on it.Small and flexible enough to cause minimal damages to the curve towards the handle.Another nice one is to use half round diamond file, preferable of a finer grit in the 600 region.Should work fine - if you plan to invest an awful lot of money on such a file.I however like things quite often done the old fashioned way.The oldest trick in the book....Whether you are using chisels and work on wood, just love to keep your knifes sharp or go on long camping or hiking trips - sharp knifes and tools just become your thing.The main thing everyone tells you is a super flat surface for whatever is supposed to sharpen your blade.For the normal stuff that is fine and good and you only need to flatten out your stones every now and then.But what about these odd jobs?Imagine you would need to sharpen a long paper cutting blade on some machine.Might be over a meter long and it has to stay with a perfectly straight edge.Back in the day this task was not done with some very expensive stone of large size....Instead sandpaper of various grit was used on a flat steel surface.I actually prefer a small pane of glass and tape my sandpaper on it.Hard to find anything finer than 1000 or 2000 grit but you might be surprised how well this stuff polishes onces clogged up a bit.Its all about the right level of wetness...Anyways, for our Kukri in question I decided it is time to do the same but in a way that does not harm the blade, constantly cut into the eraser and still is solid and "flat".If you still work with a sickle then you already know where I am going here ;)I used a small diameter spray can as my surface to hold the sandpaper.Of course a piece of PVC pipe, round wood or similar would warok the same way....Sticky tape does not work well with sandpaper unless you use double sided stuff.But it is enough to wrap one round on the top and one on the bottom of the sandpaper on the can to hold in place.So much for the basics....If you know how to sharpen a knife then you also know that there is a prefered way of doing it.Depending on the blade and stone in question you literally try to cut a thin slice out of the stone with every stroke.Either stright or with a cutting motion.This works fine with sandpaper on a flat surface, not so much however on a round surface.Try it and you see how you cut off the sand from the paper and constantly ruin your edge.The only way to do it is to move with the edge.You start from the heel and stroke to the tip.The can is used likea sharpening rod and shall always stay at a 90° to the curve of the blade.Takes a bit of practice to find the right grip to hold the blade while moving and twisting the can but well worth it.The rounded surface only allows for a very thin area of the sandpaper to work on the edge.I started with 120 grit!!!It left a trail of destruction on the edge, at least in the rounded up section....Once I only had a very thin bit left on the edge from the old sharpening I switched to 240 grit until a flat edge formed.As the Kukri was a disaster this process still tok over 4 hours to complete.That blade was properly hardened too...The start of the finnishing was done by jump right to 600 grit paper.The first can was just slightly smaller in diameter than the concave bend in the blade - perfect to smooth out those nasty bumps.But with a burr forming now on the edge and minor mishap with angle of the can towards the curve of the blade would mean cutting into the can while sharpening the concave bit.Meant I used my emergency insect repellant can as I did not like the idea of hoping my pepper shaker would start leaking while sharpening ;)If you blade is not too damaged you can of course start right away with a smaller diameter.The process is the same as before.Move along the blade and keep the can at the 90° angle towards the curve.Once you feel a burr forming on the side turn over until you have a bur on the previous side again.Repeat until all the marks from the coarser grit are gone and the edge has a uniform shine.Switch to a finer grit and go as high as you can here.I had to stop at 1000 grit as my supply of 2000 and 4000 grit is out.Hints and tricks along the way....It really helps to do this sandpaper sharpening under running water.The paper won't clog up, you won't risk a losse grain making really deep marks...But on a bad blade this can take several hours and would do it with a small aquarium pump or so and some gloves.A fine but stiff brush and soapy water however do wonders to clean up used sandpaper!I prefer to use these re-used pieces before switching to a finer grit.In most cases they are already finer than the next grit and create a nice polish that makes the visual confirmation of your right angle and angle of attack easy.A kukri is a working blade!It is mot meant to make fish filet or shave you legs.It is somewhere between axe, big bowie knife and hatchet.That mean if you would dare to give a 8° angle either side of the edge you would have a pretty damn wide edge...Stick to the original in width but keep it nice and flat.It is good compromise between cutting sharpness and durability when for example chopping wood for your camp fire.DO NOT USE A BELT SANDER!!I said it before but have to repeat it again as there is people using a big belt sander with enough free space to add a set of wheel that creat the curve I got from my spray can.The guys in India that make these knife do this blind folded....It takes years of practise to get the steady hand required not to cut through the belt.The beginners start in reverse, meaning the belt runs towards the edge.These guys only to the basic forming of the edge with really coarse grit.Basically to remove the marks from the forging.After that the pro takes over the blades and he has the belt running towards the edge!If you are silly enough to try it at home be prepared to have the belt flying in your face very violently!!The reverse sanding can't be used to finnish a blade as you never get a proper sharpness and flatness right on the edge.So just stick to manual and take an hour or so longer but then be able to enjoy a cold drink when done.You need surprisingly little sandpaper in terms of clogging up and getting useless until you get to the finer grits.If you use a wooden dowel or similar then make it a bit longer and add strips about 6cm wide of sandpaper.This way you have all the grits you need in one place and can take them with you to keep your blade sharp ;)If you glue it onto the stick it is also quite easy to give it quick brush clean when done.The really tricky part starts from about 800 grit onwards.Every mishap on the concave part can mean damage to your paper or to your edge.When using stone most beginner think that using a lot of pressure is a good way to remove the material quickly.In reality however it is just a sure way to wobble the blade over the stone, especially if the blade is not fully straight.Sandpaper can be more aggressive than your stones as in our case you only work with a little area and every time you turn the can only a little bit you have a fresh piece of paper working instead of a slurry building up.This mean you really do't need much pressure at all.It is the repetition, not the pressure that gives you the edge if you don't mind the pun here. ;)For a real working knife stopping at 1000 grit once you do single strokes either side of the blade is sufficient.The tiny burr left will disappear quickly during use and the Chakmak can be used for a quick refurbishing after every longer use.Should mean you only need to get the sandpaper out once you edge actually started to get blunt again.The final stroke....There are those people that don't have a kukri to go camping...Some people like to collect them.Restoring an old kukri can be done like with any other knife.That is until you want a razo sharp edge that is also highly polished.This is quite possible with the original edge width on the kukri.But of course you can only go so far with sandpaper....Modern technolgy provides us with the solution in several options.Firstly we have the ceramic sharpening rods.Unless you can do with kitchen variety thickness you need to pay a lot of money.A short 8cm diameter rod can set you back over 100 bucks with ease.Especially if you want something that provides a mirror like finnish.And alternative that is often available relatively cheap is a ruby rod.They can often be found with slight damages that make them useless for laser applications.Even burnt out rods are still fine as long as they are not cracked.It is quite hard (literally) to give them a satin finnish but I found that good quality sandpaper is sometimes capable of doing it.I like one side smooth and the other half of the rod with a satin finnish to prepare the edge.On the budget there is quality wet and dry sandpaper as commonly used in paintshops.If used dry the finer grits tend to clog up on such a wide edge.Once you have a piece of 1000 or finer grit that is fully clogged up you can use to give the edge a final polish.With this you won't even need a leather strop anymore but as said it takes a lot of practise so you won't cut the paper in the concave area.The steel rod....If you happen to have a hardened steel rod, like from a motion rail, small drive shaft or a big drill then give it a try.When using a drill:Of course use the end of the drill, not the working part ;)Also make sure it really is motth as any burr from the chuck or such will cause deep scratches on your blade.If it starts to feel sticky after a few good stroke you know the drill method is working.If it continues to feel very smooth and you don't see any polishing effect at all if tried on a small area only then you blade is of really good quality.But then again you would have confirmed that already by the ongoing swearing during the endless hours trying to remove some material from the edge...A word of advise for the first time user of a kukri:Although a good kukri is hard to damage without hitting a stone or metal, you can make blunt very quickly.It is top heavy blade and requires a steady hand when working on other things than meat.Chopping into some wood and letting the blade slip can deform your edge.A little mishap can be fixed with chakmak but not if hit hardwood badly a couple of times.And tempting as might be to use it as a small hatchet or axe to split your kindling:Never hold a piece of wood and then hack into it from the top with your kukri!Not only can you miss the wood and hit your hand, the wood can also split far easier or in unexpected directions!If the kurki is sharp you then have a good chance to loose a finger or two!

Topic by Downunder35m 


Project VR6

Hello all, thought id share my progress of my 97' VW Golf mk3 VR6 2.8 to create some discussion and VAG banter. I brought her completly standard and wanted to build a real sleeper for road use and track use that is fast, practical for everyday use and safe for the family. When I got her back in 2009 she was a standard vr6 nothing really special just a well looked after example Firstly I gave her a good clean inside and out along with a service.......and by clean i mean really cleaning, shampoo the carpet, treat the leather, clean out the heater units, remove and shampoo the roof lining, polish and resin the paint, de greese and steam clean the engine bay to name some of the bits ive done. The result was a very clean base "template" Once all was clean and I could see areas for imporvement I began the work, replacing all the bushes, front and rear lower arms, brake lines, discs, calipers, exhaust were the easy steps When it came to the engine itself I did not want to mess about with it too much just improve the BHP and general running of the car as 174bhp from a 2.8 VR6 is shocking. So removed the engine and re conditioned the gearbox and clutch. While this was out I thought it best to also do the pull chain not a big job but much easier with everything out, once back in I still was not finished.... After giving the engine a full service with new plugs, leads, coil pack, oil change, rocker cover, inlet manifold, seals, upgraded air filter I decided to get the car chipped to see what BHP could be pulled out of her. Happy to say with all that work she was running on the first dyno 192bhp a massive improvement from standard 174bhp and all that from just replacing and upgrading some standard old parts with more expensive performance parts. Once the Chip was installed and the guys at the tuning store had done their works she was happily chucking out 216.4BHP With that I was more than happy and the work put in over the 6month period really showed. I then decided to have all but bumpers colour coded and did a few minor tweeks to the exterious to make her a clean standard example... I will add a full list of specs and work done soon, enjoy the pics feedback welcome

Topic by Jedi_zombie85   |  last reply