Can someone explain what all these connections on this transformer are for?

I pulled this transformer out of a complex circuit I found in the electronics recycling box. It says it's a "TurboLink Switching Power Supply" but I have no idea what that is either. Perhaps someone could explain that too?

Anyways, I want to see if I can possibly use this transformer in a DC circuit to increase the voltage, but it would help if someone could explain which wires are connected to the primary and secondary windings! Also it would be nice if someone told me if it's even possible to increase the voltage in a dc circuit. For example, is there a way I can connect this transformer to a battery so that it converts 1.5v to something higher?

If you look at the picture, I think the 6 connections poking out just under the yellow part are all connected to the two wires coming out at the top beside my index finger. Then there are two leads and the bottom. Anybody know what they do? I connected one end of a 1.5v battery to one of the leads at the bottom and when I rub the other end of the battery on the other lead it produces small sparks.

Picture of Can someone explain what all these connections on this transformer are for?
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jeff-o7 years ago
That is a multi-tap transformer. When connected to AC on one side, multiple smaller AC voltages are available at the output. These voltages are specific to the requirements of the board the transformer was taken from - perhaps the outputs are supplying 3,3, 5 and 12V, for example.

In order to use the transformer as park of a step-up DC-DC converter, you'll need a whole lot more parts than just this transformer! Basically, you need to convert that 1.5V to AC, send it through a transformer, then convert it back to DC. A google search should yield a schematic or two.

Also, stop hooking up that poor battery directly to the transformer! You're shorting it out. Batteries don't like that.
colectron7 years ago
switching transformers are very small for the power they provide..BUT they run at a very high frequency of ac...approx 15-16,000 hz. and use switching power transisters.. the transformer is almost useless at 60 hz..very little power and will get very hot..very fast..once the smoke escapes from electronics...only the smell remains...HA
This is a switch mode transformer... It is generally used in Battery eliminator or stablizers.This has ac primary winding on one side and ac secondary winding on the other side.. The input terminal has two wires , must be red and black (if colored) and need to be connected to the ac input.
And for the output you can use multimeter after making connection , which give different output voltage ranging from 1.5-12V....And remember not to short them in any possible ways...Their must be one which is common called 'transformer common' , we generally use the first one as the common...For testing with multimeter, put black probe in transformer common and put the red probe in the remaining terminals, one by one.... And see the reading ...
In this way you would be able to use different voltage for different purpose....
And don't forget to conver it in DC using IN4007 Diode.....
______7 years ago
One H*** of a transformer
ol1v33r7 years ago
Baboom! This might be what you are looking for. Google will it ever fail?

http://www.rowan.sensation.net.au/electronics/stepup.html
Re-design7 years ago
Two of them are the input a/c at what ever voltage the transformer needs. and the others are taps at different voltages.
Seconded. The other taps all look to be connected to each other, because they are -- but they have lots of loops of wire between them. Each one will put out a different ac voltage compared to the 2 on the input primary.
orksecurity7 years ago
Transformers don't transform DC. Websearch "DC to DC converter" (or look for instances here on Instructables) for examples of circuits that convert DC to pulsed DC, put _that_ through the transformer, then rectify/filter/regulate it back to DC at the new voltage.