How can I patch a pair of jeans?

For reasons yet unknown, my newest pair of jeans is developing several holes in it. Just the left leg, in irregular patterns, with no apparent cause. It was initially a handful of quarter sized holes and I believed they were related to something I had done at work or had in my pocket but since then more smaller ones have started to appear. (Pictures can be produced if necessary.) Now while the obvious answer would be to get new jeans, they are my newest pair, fit well, and have the carpenter augments.

In short I would like to keep them. I have some older pairs of jeans I can shred up for patches, but I wear these primarily for work. I work in retail at a home improvement store, where appearance is somewhat regulated. I can't just go willy nilly and make them look ridiculous. They have to still be, at the core, blue jeans, but if I can repair them, and potentially dress them up a little in the process, I'd be thrilled. Also if it can be a fairly simple fix, because I don't have a sewing machine and am not overly good, or patient, with a needle, it would be appreciated.

For a little extra and over the top I am engaged in the steampunk movement, but as far as fashion goes I have not seen much done with blue jeans that leaves them recognizable. Right now my main touch is a pocket watch on a chain, but any other ideas that contribute into the current repair would be appreciated. 

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Gorfram7 years ago
To keep the jeans "dressed-up looking." I'd suggest picking one type of patch and using it, with some variations, for all the repairs.

In additon to plain denim iron-ons, you can get embroidered appliqués at most fabric and craft stores. Blue five-pointed stars are very commonly available in a variety of sizes, and a scattering of comparitively subtle stars might be very "steampunk formal." (And for spots that are just barely developing, a five-sided asterisk-shaped start is a very easy needle repair.)

Fleurs-de-lis are also common, as are lots of other motifs - I'd stick with all one type of motif (stars, fleurs-de-lis, curliques, whatever), and all in blue to keep the "dressed up" thing going. If the ones you want aren't available as iron-ons, you can use a layer of double-sided fusible interfacing (commonly known by the brandname "Wonder-Under") to make them iron-on-able.

I strongly suggest securing all the edges of all iron-ons with Fray-Check (brand name) or something similar, or else finding some needle-handy person who can be bribed into sewing them down for you (bribe should be medium-hefty: it's not a particularly easy sewing job.)
Gorfram7 years ago
Thanks for giving me "Best Answer." :)

(And of course you knew that I meant "a five-sided asterisk-shaped star.")
(And that there is "a rat" in "comparatively.")
Re-design7 years ago
Look over on the right under "RELATED". See if any of them fits. Otherwise no sewing machine then Iron on patch.
ElusiveGreen (author)  Re-design7 years ago
I make a point of exhausting possible solutions first. Some of them are fairly open and the no sew methods featured to the right seem to deal more with tears, not holes. Could you tell me more about this iron on method?
It's blue jean material that is backed by a heat activated glue. You trim the patch to size and just iron it on. Very durable. My mom used to iron them on before I started wearing them so they would last all year.

You should be able to get them at a department store or maybe Walmart.

Well, I just did a search on google and Amazon has them.
aeray7 years ago
Have you been around any car-type batteries lately? Sounds like what happens when you splash a bit of acid around.
ElusiveGreen (author)  aeray7 years ago
I had considered that too, but I only handle those kinds of batteries with gloves, and I immediately place them in acid resistant bags as per procedure. Either way it needs to be fixed XD