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can atoms be moved in elements such as gold by manipulating electrons while thier moving around the atom?

I want to know if it is possible so I can build a device to levitate a piece of wood with electromagnetic fields.#

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rickharris5 years ago
You vary between altering gold to altering wood.

The nature of magnetism is that minute magnetic domains are aligned to make the product have an overall magnetic field.

None magnetic materials do not have these magnetic domains a property of ferrous metals) and there isn't a way to give them this property.

I suppose if you could play with the material at an atomic level then something may be possible, but you can't do that - No one can.

Put simply the physical properties of materials are bound up with their atomic structure - changing that structure would remake the material into something else However the atomic structure is not easily available for modification - you can rearrange the atoms e.g. by freezing or melting and you can see that the structure changes BUT that isn't the same as changing the atomic properties.

Sorry.
nerd7473 (author)  rickharris5 years ago
I think your getting the idea I just want to use electrons that are moving arund a atom and manipulate them so no matter what the object is I can levitate it with hopefully10-20 teslas which I have no idea how to make that much power other than using tesla coils to generate the energy required to manipulste atoms. thanks for the explanation -nerd7473
That's not how electrical energy works.

in their own right the electrons that form part of the atom are negatively charged.

Materials can be charges depending on the material by "manipulating" those electrons. For example stripping electrons off will leave an overall positively charged material.

Or Add in more electrons will lead to a negatively charged material.

Like all "word models" this explanation isn't necessary really what is happening. Matter is more complex than that.

Such charged materials CAN be levitated by a static charge for example from a van de Graff generator.

This

http://www.thinkgeek.com/geektoys/science/af4c/?cpg=clrss

for example.

You can stick a balloon to the ceiling by rubbing it on your hair or jumper. It will be supported by the static attraction between it and the ceiling.

Gravity is actually a fairly weak force.

BUT Wood for example isn't a very good charge material (look up the

triboelectric series

http://www.thinkgeek.com/geektoys/science/af4c/?cpg=clrss

For materials that can be charged.
nerd7473 (author)  rickharris5 years ago
thanks I am still trying to understand the simple electron but it is so much harder than I thought I cant wait to go to vo tech and learn more about electricity.
:-) The Newton model of electrons as negatively charged particles orbiting the atom nucleus like planets works for most things.

However the quantum view of electrons sees them as regions of energy vibrating according to their energy level.

Mmmm I think Ill stick to the Newtonian model.
lemonie5 years ago
What are you talking about / where are you getting these ideas from?

L
nerd7473 (author)  lemonie5 years ago
I have aspergers they just pop into my head!!!
I don't think that I have aspergers, but I have "mad" ideas too. However, I do have a fairly good idea where these ideas come from; how are you imagining to make non-conductive/magnetic materials behave otherwise (from a physics basis)?

L
nerd7473 (author)  lemonie5 years ago
Sorry it just popped into my head so I asked if it was possible
Burf5 years ago
So you want to make a piece of wood magnetic? Try ironwood.
Seriously though, for all practical purposes the answer to your question is no.
You can embed a piece of ferrous metal or magnet in wood or you can even grow wood around a piece of ironor steel (I have a piece of wood hanging on my shop wall that has a horseshoe embeded in it) and levitate that.
nerd7473 (author)  Burf5 years ago
no I want to manipulate atoms in a nonconductive items
Burf nerd74735 years ago
In that case, you need unrestricted access to a particle accelerator or a nuclear bomb.
rickharris5 years ago
NO.
nerd7473 (author)  rickharris5 years ago
Can you explain why not?
kelseymh5 years ago
You're not manipulating atoms. Magnetic levitation (in particular, diamagnetic levitation) is certainly possible. Wood, unfortunately, is not diamagnetic, so you're out of luck there. You could consider wrapping the wood in silver or lead.

And by the way, your keywords are wrong. Magnetic levitation has nothing to do with gravity.
nerd7473 (author)  kelseymh5 years ago
I know that its just the name of the idea