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Common Organisms as Biomarkers and Bioindicators

 We are researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, working on a project related to 'biosensing', 'biomarkers', and 'bioindicators'. We want to know how plants, animals and other organisms can be used to monitor the environment or tell us something about our ecosystem. In the name of science and for fun, please share some examples from your work or personal experience.

http://staceyk.org/biomarkers

Thanks in advance for all your help!

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Goodhart6 years ago

Several "general" examples spring to mind:  trees that have bark that darkens pr lightens in the presence of certain air borne contaminates, butterflies that depend on dark or light colored bark for their camouflage, etc.

lemonie6 years ago
Why are you not using a Carnegie web-space? You'd think that they'd provide what you needed without you having to spend money on a private domain-name and web-site?

This is Carnegie Mellon University, are they sadly-lacking in some areas?
(confused)

L
Some university and research sites limit what sort of backend stuff users can have in their personal areas.  At SLAC, for example, PHP is specifically prohibited on the site servers, and CGI scripts (generally written in Perl) are installed on a dedicated DMZ server and must be vetted by Computing Security before they are installed.  I have no idea what CMU's rules are, I'm just generalizing from my own experience.
I'm really disappointed. This is an institution I know of, and they expect students to spend money on their own DN and server-space for their course of study because C-M doesn't offer the right functionality?!

L
They may not be "lacking functionality." 

SLAC's restrictions are there specifically to limit all of the potential attacks which are opened up by server-side scripting.  Since SLAC can't easily track or limit what kind of scripts users might install, it is simpler, and more secure, to limit scripts entirely.

Universities tend to be more liberal than guvmint sites, but CMU, being one of the earliest Web-server sites around (SLAC was second after CERN, by the way :-), has been subject to such attacks for a very long time.  That may have made them less open than you might like.
I'm still really disappointed, this is C-M and some poor-student has (?) to go independent to pursue their study.
?

L