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Jochen Gross made this wonderful compilation of digital wood joints under CC license (various CAD files also available to download on his site).

I wanted to be able to look at them all at once at marvel at their beauty, so I whipped up this poster-format visual reference. It's under CC non-commercial share-alike license. Large .PNG here and downloadable PDF below. Enjoy!

edit: in case you don't have access to a plotter or other large-format printer, I've put it up on Society5 print-on-demand site. You can find it here.

<p>Great work Ladycartoonist. Thanks for sharing. My new CNC machine is going to make lots of chips.</p>
<p>Trying to make a buck on instructable as advertising is not cool. How do we notify instructables that this is just an advertising ploy?</p>
<p>What it is advertising? These are from a free resource pack. As others mentioned, it is CC (attribution/non-commercial use only/share-alike).</p>
<p>$15-47 for S/H is NOT free or anywhere near that,and obviously NOT not-for-PROFIT,it is simply a way for their &quot;Company&quot; to try to reach a lot of people here who are interested in DIY stuff for FREE.It is the same as spam,and should be removed as such.Otherwise &quot;sell&quot; them for the TRUE S/H to a given location.OR,just tell the people here who may not be aware,to take the file to Officemax,Kinkos(there are other much cheaper places} or similar and get large poster-size printed for MUCH less than Society6,or use their normal printers at home to print it out in several pages,and just tape them all together.</p>
<p>You are welcome to take the PDF, which is of poster-size quality, to any printer you choose, for free. Some people might not live near one or have the time to go themselves, so I gave an option for an online resource to do so. With Society6, the creator -me- can choose what profit they want (for example, the base cost would be $15, i could choose 'my profit, $3' and it would show as costing you $18). I have chosen $0. So in this case, if/when those posters sell, I am making $0 profit (nor am I seeing any money or doing anything with printing). I have no affiliation with Society6, I'm just an illustrator/designer/maker trying to share so the most people can have this on their wall.</p>
<p>LadyCartoonist,Then I apologize,stand corrected,and applaud you for not taking/adding an up-charge.I just mainly wanted others to know there ARE cheaper ways to do this at home,and mentioned,as you just did too,to mosaic a larger print,or find a much cheaper source to print the file(which you DID provide freely,Thank You!)It just seemed fishy at the time I read it,and again,my apologies.</p>
<p>No worries. I understand wanting to keep this a community of non-commercial resources. I just want people to be happy makers :)</p>
<p>Nice to provide the content, thanks!</p><p>But YES, i'bles 'featured' it, and they have advertisers, so despite the authors intent, this website still makes $$cha-ching$$ off of CC licensed material. </p><p>Boom!</p>
<p>C'mon, the PDF is right there in the Instructable - download it, print it. Now you have a (hard) copy for free. If you want a bigger version than you can print at home, take the PDF to a local print place and have them print it whatever size you want. Please don't tell me that you want the Author to pay to have it printed near you.</p><p>I have never heard of Society5 (6?), and for 26 bucks I would want it to be mounted on foam core and framed, so there it NO WAY I would pay that much to have it show up at my door. But hey, if having it printed on acid free, lignin free, gluten free, archival quality recycled organic cotton angels robes is important to you, order it from them. But don't complain that the Author wont subsidize the cost for you.</p><p>LazyGlen</p>
<p>Oh--I didn't see they were selling it. I just printed one on a large format printer I have here. I mean, they provided the PDF though--I always figured most instructables users are aware that you can take the PDF and do what you want, like resize it and print it on 8.5x11 if that's what you have access to, or make it your desktop wallpaper, or just keep it around for reference. This is maybe the second or third time I've seen an instructable that I found useful that included a 'for sale' link but also gave out files for free, and in the end I'm glad they posted it/featured it because it meant I found out about the resources and made cool stuff quickly.</p>
<p>See my reply above- I am personally not selling it, I have chosen $0 profit on society6. I have nothing to do with the website, just offering one option if people don't have access to a large format printer.</p>
<p>Instructables &quot;featured&quot; it. The author is giving you a CC-licensed poster, and offering a way to get it printed. That seems pretty cool to me.</p>
<p>Thanks for understanding! Maybe I could have worded it better.</p>
<p>Meredith,</p><p>Thanks so much for putting together this visual resource, it really shows just how creative CNC work can become. Are you aware of any vector models, Vectric Files, or tool paths to cut out any of them? I'd love to cut them out and take high quality photos &amp; videos of each joint functioning. I'm at dp@dperry.com</p>
<p>Cool, but those all seem way too complicated. I do a lot of woodworking, machining, etc. and am a Mechanical Engineer actively engaged in engineering design. I wouldn't release engineering with joints like these. KISS principle...</p><p>But, again, they're cool!</p>
<p>Great.. thanks for sharing..</p><p>:)</p>
<p>Suggestion:</p><p>Very cool but as someone who doesn't know anything about woodworking, what I would like to see some indication of how strong each joint is and what application it's suitable for. Maybe do this with little colour-coded squares/dots and a legend at the bottom?</p>
<p>I think offering to print this at a charge is fine. Most folks don't have a plotter/large-format printer. This is primarily an offer of a free file for a handy poster, copy etc. If you want to have it printed by somebody else for less cost, I'm sure Ladycartoonist will not be sending out goons to shatter your knees.</p><p>At least the link didn't infect my computer with adware.</p>
<p>Great Job!!! I now know what my cnc router will be doing for awhile. Anyone working on some of the joints from the published wood working joint books??</p>
<p>I'm about to print one and put it up in our woodshop! I keep telling people about this resource pack, but I think this will be more effective.</p>
<p>Awesome! Please take a photo, I'd love to see it!</p>
<p>Picture attached to this comment.</p>
<p>awesome! So great to see!</p>
<p>nice, I will definitely put one of these up in our shop!</p>
<p>I was wondering why you called it &quot;<em>Digital Joints</em>&quot; until i looked at the image closer... yeah... CNC definably needed for most of these. I never really thought of using my CNC in this way... all that power and I have still been using conventional joint methods. </p><p>I <strong>really need</strong> to give some of these a try... thanks so much for sharing!</p><p>Jerry</p>
<p>Dunno about CNC needed, but definitely designed for CNC (or possibly a router) in mind. To me, half of it is fairly traditional - but modified with large radiused corners so you don't have to swap out bits.</p><p>Note to the author: You might be interested in some of the joinery techniques addressed in <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Fine-Woodworking-On-Joinery-articles/dp/0918804256" rel="nofollow">http://www.amazon.com/Fine-Woodworking-On-Joinery-...</a> (unnafiliated) and other joinery books. The above book example has some very interesting articles on tusk tennon/knockdown joinery, routed hinges and some reaaaaally neat decorative sliding dovetail joinery (similar to &quot;lengthen with meander key&quot;). At the least keep an eye out for it at the library.</p>
<p>Very cool, thank you!</p>
I love this, very handy! I just assembled my Shapeoko so this is very timely for me. You might want to repost the images if you can correct the spelling of tennons to tenons, ginko to ginkgo, and eliptical to elliptical.<br>Thanks for this 'ible!
<p>Very useful. Thanks a lot.</p>
<p>Merci beaucoup,</p>
<p>Amazing reference - thank you.</p>

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Bio: Artist in Residence at Instructables. I'm a hardware hacker, artist, illustrator, and cartoonist. I make things with whatever tools I can. I design and ... More »
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