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I make pasta from scratch every once in a while. It's easy to do, and the results are delicious.

The process of pasta making is easier to show than to write about; so, this Instructable will mostly be pictures of the process with a little bit of written direction.

The kind of pasta I make has only four ingredients:

2 cups Flour
3 large Eggs
1 tsp Olive Oil
0-3 tsp Water

Step 1: Add Ingredients

Measure out two cups of flour and dump them on a clean work surface. Use your hand to create a depression in the flour. Crack your three eggs into the depression. Add 1 tsp olive oil to the eggs.

Don't worry if the flour walls begin to crumble. It won't affect the pasta, but it will make more of a mess.
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>If I wanted to know how to make the pasta. I would have asked. What I asked was how to make spaghetti. Not Pasta!!!</p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti?</p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>It's been a long while since I did this. But here's the deal. Before they had pasta machines, they had to do it by hand. So how did they make spaghetti? </p><p>First off, the principle is that when you let dough rest, it bonds stronger. So it becomes more elastic, and will stretch opposed to tearing. You still need to be gentile with it, or it will still break, Hence this method.</p><p>you take the dough, and with your hands on a floured board roll it evenly into a log. You want to have a decent amount of flour on your board as you'll need it. And this will take several times before you get it down, so don't get upset when it doesn't work. </p><p>You grab each end, lifting it off the board, and lightly twirl it so that it stretches evenly. then fold it (it should be as long as the original log now, but double the length and half the diameter. Flour it a little so it doesn't stick, and again grab each end, lifting and twirling in the same manner. fold, flour, repeat. Do this until you get it to the desired thickness. Once done, cut off the ends you held to stretch it, and you should have your spaghetti. </p><p>You may need to let it rest a little each time you stretch it after flouring it, so it doesn't tear while continually stretching it. But in essence this is how it's made, by hand, without any machines. </p>
<p>thank you.</p><p>it took half an hour of searching through posts of ppl mixing jars of bolognaise sauce with packets of boiled pasta from a packet and calling it &quot;how to make spaghetti&quot; before i found this post which actually shows how to make spaghetti<br><br>instructables really needs to pull its fingers out of its ass and delete misleading posts</p>
<p>I have been making fresh pasta for a while and I make it really well, but when i add it to a sauce it just ends up all stuck together. It tastes great but its not right. When i use bought dried pasta it stays all seperate. Any help would be great</p>
<p>I think you can add a cup of the water you used to cook the spaghetti into the sauce if you're making the sauce yourself. the startch in the water should help keep your pasta seperated </p>
<p>Your recipe was right on target! My great grandmother who was 100% Italian has made homemade pasta since I was very young. It was delicious, and your recipe is the same as hers. :-) It sounds like some people do not know how to make REAL homemade pasta, and feel the need to blame everyone but themselves. </p>
<p> So I've been experimenting with making homemade pasta and <br>this is a pretty standard recipe. <strong>However, my pasta never tastes good</strong>...I've <br>tried several ways so far. I've made it with all-purpose flower and just water. <br>Meh. I've tried half all-purpose flower half semolina and egg. Meh. I've tried <br>all-purpose flower with egg and olive oil . Meh. I've experimented with <br>different resting times for the dough and different thicknesses for the final product. I always have a pretty good tomato sauce <br>to go with my pasta, but when I add the sauce to the pasta, the pasta seems to kill <br>the flavor of the sauce and everything tastes super bland. Yes, I've tried <br>adding more salt, but the whole point was to get away from too much salt, and <br>it didn't help anyway.</p>
Can you describe the taste of the pasta? Is it just salty or does it taste funny in other ways? Chances are you are cooking it for too long, which makes te pasta soggy and tasteless, only the saltiness remains (if you incorporate salt in the recipe). Also, all eggs works the best and is the tastiest, you should only add water or oil if absolutely needed, for instance when the dough seems a bit dry, because especially oil will change the taste quite heavily if you overdo it. I've had the last one happen myself, it's a pretty easy mistake to make when using oil.<br>Furthermore, remember that a fresh pasta only needs to cook for 3 to 4 minutes, wait for the water to boil, then add the pasta.<br>Hope this is of any help, good luck!
I think bernardhkuiper is right on this one. Try a shorter cooking time, the pasta is probably soaking up too much water and diluting your tasty tomato sauce. <br><br>One thing I like to do is to put the pasta and sauce in a pan and turn the heat up on the stove all the way, and then toss and turn the pasta and sauce for a couple minutes. It drives off some of the water from the sauce and the pasta will tend to soak up some of the sauce's flavor.
Can you sub the olive oil for grape seed oil? I am allergic to olives and their biproducts
Yes! Grape seed oil should be fine, or you can just omit the oil.
<p>plz help</p>
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<p>plz help</p>
<p>plz help</p>
<p>plz help</p>
<p>plz help</p>
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You can store dry pasta.
<p>I would like to make this and preserve it in bags or even canning jars. How would I do this?</p>
I normally just freeze the pasta. No need to defrost, just drop in boiling water like normal. <br><br>I would think that it would mold if you were doing some kind of preservation other than freezing. This kind of pasta is typically made daily.
<p>what type of flour is used for this?</p>
<p>I normally use all purpose unbleached white flour. Bread flour works a little bit better, but is not required. </p>
<p>ok thanks</p>
<p>Can you use half regular flour and half wheat flour with the same amount of the other ingredients? Thank you. </p>
<p>That should work fine. You might have to knead a little more and add a little more water. </p>
This was a huge disappointment. I was going to surprise my girlfriend with homemade spaghetti. I'm a decent cook; I make homemade bread(all by hand), homemade pizza, Chinese good, Indian food, etc. So I'm not a bad cook. I tried twice to get this recipe to work. Three eggs isn't nearly enough to mix in 2 cups of flour. The first time I ended with an unworkable, crumbly mess, and the second time I ended up with a hard, elastic, unworkable lump and about a half a cup of flour left. I wasted 6 eggs and 4cups of flour on this. I spent an hour trying to get it to work and all I have to show for it is sore arms, an hour's wasted time, and a bunch of wasted food. I'mnot trying to be rude, but I'm very upset and disappointed. I was really looking forward to treating us both, and on our income, that's a LOT of food going into the garbage can. I just looked at another version which said you should have 2/3 c flour to 2 eggs, which would come out to something like 5 eggs. Now I'm afraid to risk wasting even more eggs to try to fix this mess. I even bought stuff to make homemade sauce. -sigh-

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