Lazyman's Mini Camping Brazier

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Introduction: Lazyman's Mini Camping Brazier

This is the Wobbler's Lazymans way to make a hobo stove/mini camping brazier. You can also pick up the components cheap enough anywhere without needing any work on them.

Step 1: Components

One stainless steel kitchen utensil holder.
4 nuts and bolts about 2" long to fit holes in utensil holder..

Step 2:

Put the bolts in four equally spaced outer holes from the inside to make four legs.

Step 3:

Ready to rock and roll.

Step 4:

Add in your tinder. I use special Wobbler's Lazyman tinder, commonly known as kitchen wipe.

Step 5:

Time to pack with any available wood. I used Wobbler's Lazyman pre-cut kindling. Pack in as much as you like.

Step 6:

Now you can either light the Wobbler's Lazyman tinder or use Wobbler's Lazyman lighting fluid (a capful of paraffin) on top. Flame on!

Step 7:

The Mini Camping Brazier burnt for about 15-20 minutes before ending up with just a little ash with one load. Considering its size, it threw out a lot of heat and only a little smoke when it got going. Because the flames work down it would be easy to keep stoking it.

If you want to make it more portable, I'd suggest you use wing-nuts to tighten up the bolts. As I'm so pleased with it I will be making a base for it out of an upside down steel plate drilled to accept the bolts so it will both protect any grass it is on and also make it more stable.

I've yet to try it with charcoal but I suspect it will work fine. As to why do this and not make it from some cans, which cost nothing? It's more durable being stainless steel and is thicker than a tin can. Plus, you can buy these pretty much anywhere real cheap and not need to work them in any way.

I didn't want it to cook on. I just like to have a small fire burning and most sites here will let you have one so long as it's not on the ground. However, with a bolted on upside down plate it will be very stable and it would be easy to rig a wire pot holder on top of it.

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21 Comments

Where do you get the utensil holder?

So long ago, I can't remember but either a local supermarket, pound store or car boot I suspect, Have a look at Wasagi's comment for an alternative.

I see by your photos, you already have used this quite consideribly.

Like alot of us that go camping, less is better. You could easily have this at the top of your sack and keep essentials in it for making your fires anyway..

I wonder how long it throws out the heat with charcoal? but 20 minutes for a good rest and finger heat up plus a cup-a-soup is great.

I like this idea going to look for a larger version though for a bigger fire, thanks for the idea.

I've now found a bigger alternative myself. It's the inside of a steamer, the bit with all the holes in. I will be modifying that and posting it soon. It was virtually nothing at £5, about 8$US and is made of strong stainless steel so should last forever outdoors with no problems rusting.

Hi, where did you find that, im after one myself. not sure what to search for...

If you're on about the inside of a steamer, they look like this as a set:
http://www.steamerreviews.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/horwood-judge-jx03-3-tier-food-steamer.jpg

You want one of the upper parts which have holes in the bottom which look like this:
http://common2.csnimages.com/lf/1/hash/2989/238271/2/Triply++Steamer+Insert+for+Saucepot.jpg

I bought mine from a car boot for a pound. It obviously doesn't make sense to pay full price for one, but you should also find one easily enough in a charity shop.

The smaller one here is a cutlery holder from Wilkinsons I think at about £2. I've even seen them in pound shops, although I'm not sure how much they cost from a pound shop.

I'm guessing one pound.

Good guess. You are wise beyond your ears.

Follow up to the steamer version:
it was difficult to get going and keep going with just the holes at the bottom. However, I got it to work OK by opening up the holes with a drill and drilling a ring of holes around the sides to let in air. It now works OK. Drilling stainless steel is fun! In the end, I found the best way was actually with a cheap blunt drill and really go for it so the stainless steel grew red hot and the drill actually melted its way through. Nice pyrotechnics, an added bonus! I'll hopefully ll eventually get round to showing it sometime.