Introduction: My Top 8 Must Know Super Cleaning Interior Tips

Picture of My Top 8 Must Know Super Cleaning Interior Tips

Video tutorial on my top 8 tips for interior detailing of a vehicle. Interior detailing tips is certainly not limited to what’s listed in this video, so if you have a tip, please be sure to share it in the comments below. These tips will help you achieve professional results without the need of professional equipment or extensive experience. Detailing a vehicle takes time, but remember a clean car is a happy car.

Tools/Supplies Needed:

  • rubber gloves
  • vacuum cleaner
  • air compressor
  • toothbrush
  • q-tips
  • clean clothes
  • high quality cleaner
  • vinyl/plastic/rubber conditioner
  • microfiber clothes
  • glass cleaner
  • paper towel

Step 1: Tip #1

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Wear rubber gloves. You would be amazed some of the nasty things that can be left behind or grow in a vehicle. This can be anything from mold, used tissues, bandaids, even drugs. So be sure to provide some protection for your hands, there are many hidden areas where you don’t always have a good visual view and you can risk coming across bacteria or getting an infection through a cut or scrape. This is especially important when the vehicle is unknown to you.

Step 2: Tip #2

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Vacuum up a majority of the loose debris and dirt. Normally starting with the floor mats, give them a quick vacuum so when removed, they do not dump any debris on the carpet or seats. Vacuum all components throughout the interior, this will give you a good base of where to start, what needs to be done, and reduce the chance of scratching interior pieces with any gritty debris.

Step 3: Tip #3

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While vacuum cleaning attachments can be rather large or awkward, use the assistance of any air compressor. It’s not always easy to remove a seat either, all you need is a small portable air compressor, direct the nozzle under the seat and you’d be amazed as this things that will blow out. Then finish up with a vacuum to removed the newly found dirt.

Step 4: Tip #4

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Use a high quality cleaner, but not something that will damage interior components. For this I normally use Spray Nine, I find all around it’s a great cleaner for removing stains, grease, oil, or any other tough build up. It also helps removing any foul odours, and moving back to tip number one with risk of infection, it’s a disinfectant that kills on contact. At the end, you’ll have a surface clean enough to eat off of.

Step 5: Tip #5

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For textured panels, hard to reach panel gabs, or trim edges, use a toothbrush, paint brush, q-tips or a toothpick. No need for investing in any fancy cleaning brushes, toothbrushes and paintbrushes can be had for quite cheap, just ensure they are soft. Use them in areas as needed such as the steering wheel, arm rest, door handles, around the radio, etc. For any extremely dirty areas, spray on a cleaner, then agitate the surface with a brush and wipe away with a damp cloth.

Step 6: Tip #6

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For clothes, sure you can go off and buy specialty versions, but why not save money and use old shirts. Over the years I have managed to collect a variety of worn out old shirt clippings, picking areas with no holes and no designs which maybe route. The fabric is already well worn so it’s quite soft, yet still durable, and it’s great being able to reduce the amount of waste too.

Step 7: Tip #7

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Ensure those plastics, vinyl and leather components have a long life by using a conditioner or protectant. UV light, as shown in my sunshade video can dry out those materials, causing them to fade, become hard, and eventually crack. These components can be expensive to replace, so preventative maintenance is a must. Various products are available on the market, cheap and expensive, determine which best suits your needs and apply accordingly. Some of these protections even help repel dirt, keeping that interior cleaner for longer too.

Step 8: Tip #8

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Clean those windows at the end. Normally I like to do a rough clean up with paper towel first and then finish up with a microfiber cloth for added cleaning action and a streak free shine. If this is not left to the end, during your clean up you may run a cleaner or conditioner on the glass, which will need to be cleaned again. So why do the same job twice? Don’t forget to roll the window down if possible to get that area which sits against the gasket. If you have tinted windows, use an ammonia free cleaner which won’t damage or deteriorate that tint.

Do you have a tip for interior detailing, please be sure to share it in the comments below. Stay up to date with my latest tutorials, don't forget to FOLLOW my profile and be sure to check out my YOUTUBE page as well for all your DIY needs.

Comments

JohnW51 (author)2017-09-24

I have a 2011 Nissan Frontier pickup that I bought used. The plastic interior door panels show some kind of discoloring that looks like it may have been caused by application of some kind of plastic protection material (such as Son-of-a-Gun) or possibly a cleaner. Is there anything I can do to restore these areas to original appearance?

4DIYers (author)JohnW512017-09-24

I would try Spray Nine. On my other car, I thinking someone had used Armor All and it seemed to have left white staining. So I kept cleaning it, took a while, but it was removed finally and looks like new now.

JohnW51 (author)4DIYers2017-09-25

Thanks! I have looked for Spray Nine products on-line and I see there are different types. Please advise the type you use.

4DIYers (author)JohnW512017-10-04

I have the multi-purpose version, I know Walmart carries it.

sparkblaze (author)2017-09-19

Nice tips, I like to push the seats full forward and full backward to help get the rest of the bits from around them when vacuuming. It's surprising how much movement there is when you usually only move it for comfort

4DIYers (author)sparkblaze2017-09-24

Thank you and excellent tip too!

gm280 (author)2017-09-19

Two things come to mine watching your videos. First, you must own a Ford Ranger Pickup. You use it in a lot of your videos. I know that vehicle extremely well because I too own one, a 1995 model in excellent condition. Second, when you clean a dash with a vinyl protectant (Armor All, Meguiars, NuVinyl, Mother's, 303, and such), do you experience a glare on the windshield from the shiny dash? I do, and it is some times hard to see through depending on how the sun is reflected. ?

4DIYers (author)gm2802017-09-24

Actually the one shown in the video isn't mine specifically (it's my parent's truck), but I have owned 2 95 Rangers in the past. The other ones I owned had grey interiors instead of beige. I've never had any issues with glaring and have always used a Mother's conditioner. Have to tried a mild polish on the glass?

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