A few weeks ago I started thinking about what to do with all the smaller pieces of wood I collected in my workshop over the years. All too small to build something, but yet too big to just throw them away. And I came up with a few ideas, so I want to share this one with you, because its rather simple, and you can use almost the smallest bits of wood for it:

Time needed: Less than one afternoon - you can also build much more at once, with only little more time.


Step 1: Materials & Tools

- Wood: find some scrap pieces/sheets of wood, not too thick, ( < ½“ is easier to cut) - you should have at least 2 different sorts/colors (better 3 or more) best is to mix with plywood or multiplex

- Wood glue (No, hot glue or superglue won’t work)

- Forstner bit: the size of the candles you want to use (a Forstner drill is made for making large holes with a flat bottom, which is exactly what we want - I used a 40mm for a tea candle)

- Power drill (a drill press would help)

- A saw: a fret saw will work, but surely you will be faster with a jig saw, table saw or band saw with a fine blade (DON'T use power tools when you haven't been properly instructed - you can do this project with just a fret saw - which I would propose to beginners!)

- Sanding block (you can also just use a piece of wood for that)

- Sand paper: 60, 100 and 200 (or similar grits)

- Clear coat and a paint bush, and again sandpaper - this time about 300 grit

- A pen, a set square, a piece of paperboard

- A vice will be helpful, but is not necessary

- Some clamps are also helpful, but aren't necessary - something heavy works just as fine

<p>Great instructions. My Oma and Opa were both Deutsche! Danke schoen, mein Herr! </p>
<p>This is AWESOME :D</p>
<p>This is AWESOME :D</p>
There are spray on fire retardants available to non-professionals just in case you wanted to be a little safer. They spray on &amp; soak into the wood &amp; then you finish it - it isn't noticeable. I like to spray it into the cup part.
Is there one in particular that you recommend? I am making some candle holders and was looking for a fire retardent spray.
hi my name is jarrad and i am a student at wesley college in perth and i was just wandering wouldnt it be better to use a sanding belt sorry is i sound silly but iam only 13 thanks. <br>
I love this idea. I had some left over quarter sawn oak, mahogany and walnut and I was able to make 9 of these. They came out great. They are going to make great Christmas gifts. Thanks for the great idea.
This looks great and I like the fact you are using your wood scraps instead of throwing them away, and several of them would make a very nice gift. All in all, a great instructable. Thank you!
Wow, what a great use for scrap wood! Very nice! If you hadn't said you were German, this silly American would never have known! Great job on the woodworking and your descriptions! ~Matt
maybe,if you had equal-ish bits of wood, you could glue them, then cut them. It would certainly make sanding more...predictable. <br /> You could also do it if you had bits that were smaller than the others, you would just have to put them higher the smaller they were... <br /> does that make sense? or am I talking out of my a*s?
I would like to give you something to think about. Instead of doing them square try to give them a shape like a cylinder or even an&nbsp;in-regular shape cutting them on the band saw. And with the different wood types and colors glued together you will get very&nbsp;unusual results.<br /> <br /> Nice instructable<br />
this is a great idead and looks great and all but wouldnt the wood burn with the candle im only 14 and new at this so just wondering
Nicely done!&nbsp; Using different types and colours of wood gives it a really interesting look!<br />

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