Building a no-tools-needed firewood rack

A stable, strong, easily-movable, cheap firewood rack is a thought-provoking project. This is what i have used for years and it works extremely well.

It holds a face-cord of heavy, wet wood with no problem and is very stable.
This is what you need:
2 or 3 concrete blocks
2 landscape timbers
2 2x4s - 8 or 10 footers cut in half.
total material cost about 20 bucks

I think the pics say it all but some tips:
- place 2 concrete blocks holes up on a stable surface, 3 if support needed in center (not often).
- place timbers across outside edges of blocks
- place 2x4 uprights in holes in blocks. If on dirt put a few
small rocks or pebbles in holes first to help drain water from 2x4' ends.
- its designed so the 2x4's are leaning out at the top. it's
very strong like this. if you find the 2x4s are spread too wide, you
can tap them closer together on a full rack as there is not that much weight on them. the last pic shows my new double rack. one more block but 4 less 2x4 pieces and stronger because of center blocks. if you enlarge the last pic, you can really see how much weight this set-up will hold. and i could put a lot more on it but its over my head..hahah
If you have any doubts about whether or not this works like i say, just read a few comments from other members, real people just telling it like it is.

I cut a piece of plastic tarp about 4' wide and 10' long to cover wood... i take a couple of holed bricks and tie lite 3' rope from one to the other and lay over tarped ends to keep tarp on in wind. all of this works really well together. rack gets stronger with more wood and is very stable. everything comes apart to move to another spot or put in storage (or use for other projects). Rack is high enough off ground to blow leaves from underneath or spray for bugs. Its nice to be able to easily move a woodrack as sometimes the ground under it becomes unstable and the rack will lean. Or sometimes you just find a better place and moving individual pieces is so much easier than moving the whole rack at once. One more thought: if you use 8' 2x4s, if you cut them in half at a 45 degree angle, you get more length and also the angle will help them drain at the top.
Update: i like to shoot pellet rifles and have a picnic table for shooting from and a nice rest. the end of the long firewood rack was in the way so i just put a "window" in it with a 2"x6" frame and now shoot thru the window 70' to my pellet trap...i love it..hahah

Wow excellent idea, used a similar idea with pallets, but your method makes more sense. Will be using this for my selling wood next year. Thanks
Simple, affordable, and way better than some sheet metal assembly that is way too flimsy. Plus, in a year or two, it'll blend right in with my weathered fence. Thanks for sharing!
<p>yeah man, glad you are giving it a try..its easy, solid and gets stronger as you add wood to it.</p>
Wow! Very impressive! I bought a metal rack, about 10 years ago when I bought my house, but I don't think it will last much longer. Will definitely give this a try. Love the idea!
So I have a full cord of wood arriving soon and wanted to ask how many of these will I need to hold the entire cord of wood?
hi one man...since a face cord of wood is 2x4x8...one rack should get er done...or very close.
<p>Thank you for the information. I (a 61-year old woman) was able to make a firewood rack, using your instructions. I spent $17.20 at Lowes. I already had sand to help level it and the concrete blocks, so all I needed was the 2x4s and the landscape timbers. So much cheaper than buying a metal one that may or may not last past one season.</p>
<p>hi sue-ann, looks like a good job to me! and i see your helper checking everything twice...hahah. i never have had any of mine wear out over many years. i have ten of them going now so am ready for winter...and now you too!!</p>
<p>Living in Florida, this will probably last me more than a year. I have a fire pit and a fireplace. We do a fire on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving, so this will be easy to get to the wood.</p><p>I had Lowes cut the 2 x 4s (10 feet long) in half, but they would not make a 45 degree cut. I told him it wasn't a deal breaker.</p><p>Now I will have to get a tarp and figure out how to keep it on, since we get a little wind.</p><p>Thank you so much for posting the instructions as I was able to do it myself, and it was so much cheaper than purchasing a metal one.</p>
<p>hi sue-ann. yes, keeping a tarp on in some wind is tricky. what i do works really well and lasts forever. get 4 holed bricks at lowes...you know, the bricks with three holes thru them...take a piece of light rope and tie between 2 bricks with about three feet of rope in between. make two sets. put tarp on pile and drape line over tarp with brick hanging on each side and line holding down tarp. one set on each end just inside each 2x4. works great even in high winds. bricks are cheap, heavy enough to work well, and light enough to move or remove easlily. i find that a tarp that covers and hangs down each side about six inches is all you need and lets the pile dry well. if you put one taller piece of wood on top center of pile, the tarp will angle down from that to each end and drain rain. good luck and you did good!</p>
<p>Excellent design and thanks for the great idea Clasof56! I modified your dimensions to fit a half chord that had to stay below a 32&quot; high railing on my apartment deck (grumpy landlord). I ended up only needing four 2&quot;x4&quot;x12' s (split in halves to form four 6' beams) and one 2&quot;x4&quot;x10' s (quartered to have four 30&quot; arms), and three cinder blocks. I purchased them all at Home Depot for around $25. I then hung two tarps on the side of the railing, stacked the wood and the covered with the tarp. Originally I had purchased and set this up for a full chord (doubling the above) but decided on a half chord. So I used some of the leftover 2x4's to hold the tarp down on the deck. </p>
<p>hello ray...looks like another good job to me. and the nice thing about wooden racks is that you can make them fit your needs, which you sure did...happy burning!!</p>
<p>here it is more full.</p>
<p>wow, now thats a serious bunch of wood...good job!</p>
<p>This looks great, but I have one question. How well does it handle high winds when you have a tarp over it?</p>
<p>well, i only have a tarp over the top and maybe 6 inches down each side. its held down with a couple holed bricks with a light line holding them together. i have never had an issue with wind.</p>
Stacked 3 deep and 3 wide used 21 cinder blocks 18 timbers and 3 2x4s<br><br>Should hold 3 cords easy Super sturdy <br><br>Under $100 in materials and better than anything sold in stores.
<p>hi charles, great racks!! i always love it when one takes it to another level. i just put up another one as i had my oaks trimmed and enjoy cutting and stacking. put up another pic when they are full...will be impressive!</p>
<p>Love this idea. Set one up in the back using pallet parts for ends. I got a cord on it. I realized I needed to out some blocks in the middle for support. My wife likes the fact that it hides the trailer that's behind it. I will be putting another on the other side of the yard soon.</p>
<p>Great and simple design. We just got a new place, and I needed a temporary wood rack for near the house. This design was a perfect fit. I had some leveling issues with the patio, and used some E Grade shingles to do it. Works great. </p>
<p>hi outoforder2day, glad you are giving it a try. you will find that it gets stronger and more stable as you add wood to it. good luck.</p>
Hello! It was simple to make and sturdy. I was able to fit a whole cord of wood. Thanks for saving us so much $$$!
<p>hi lianag1, glad you are having success. one thought: your end 2x4s are turned the wrong way. it might work that way but is stronger the other way.</p>
Super easy... Thank you so much. Gonna make an 8 footer this weekend... Dirt cheap.
<p>I have a question about the 2&quot; x 4&quot; end supports:</p><p>I have noticed that some are cut at the 45 degree angle and some are just cut straight. What are the pros and cons to both. They both look very stable, so is it just an aesthetic preference? Also, if you go with the 45 degree angle cut, is the part in the concrete block also cut at a 45 degree angle? Thanks for your answer.</p>
<p>hi briget, i cut the 2x4 tops at an angle just to keep water off. the bottoms are not cut. but i really dont think it matters much.</p>
I made 2 12'x6' units
<p>wow, Randy and Dave...you both make me grin....hahah....I never have thought about stacking that high,,,,whew.. are your stacks good and solid that high? this is breaking new ground for me so i dont know. but they sure look good and straight. hope both of you have a good, solid base. thanks for posting the pics, made my day..</p>
Got my fingers crossed
I made this rack yesterday. I spent about 28.00 in matierials at Lowes. It took about 15 minutes to set it up, including transporting the matierials to the setup area and leveling. I have filled it up. Seems very stable and I have the wood stacked at least 7 ft. high. I am very satisfied with the way it turned out and I am planning on making one, and perhaps two more.
absolutely!! as long as you are on a stable surface and for 12' long have a center block for support. i also like the longer racks as you have more room for size separation and selection. put up a pic when you finish, would like to see it.
Im gonna make 2 12' long racks with 5 cinder blocks on each one.
I plan on making this about 12 feet long or maybe longer...seems like shouldn't matter how long right?
<p>I used spam cans cut in half to top the end pieces. They fit a standard 2 x 4 just perfect without trimming, and should keep the top ends dry and rot proof.</p>
hahahh...thats great. sounds like a zero-cost, last-forever tweak.
<p>Fantastic idea! Finally got around to putting together one of my own and so far it's working out great. This is about 1/4 cord so far but I expect the rack will easily take another 1/8 cord.</p>
hi, i looked at your pic and i think you have the end 2x4's going the wrong way...the 4&quot; part of the 2x4 should be going the same way as the bottom pieces. look at other pics or mine.
<p>Yes, I unfortunately realised this right after I had loaded with about 1/2 the wood. Not going to take it apart just yet but once I've burned through the wood I'll make the necessary changes.</p>
<p>well, at least you are aware of your mistake. but you know the old saying....a job well done is a joy forever. why not take 15 minutes to correct it and post a pic of your nicely done woodrack.</p>
<p>love an idea that is so simple that I slap my own forehead and say,&quot;why did I not thimk of that&quot;</p>
Right alongside you Bobby. Holy crap, this is a super awesome and sturdy firewood rack. Thanks so much for the nice details and pics. Now, where is the vote button on this one?
<p>Excellent instructions and voila, I made one too! I put a mixture of pebbles and sand inside the base of the cinder blocks to provide better drainage for the uprights. The toughest part was sawing the uprights in half with a hand saw. I do not have a power saw. I have the wood pile covered with a slate gray tarp and we are ready for the rain and the cold! </p>
<p>Forgot to say, Thank You, classof56!</p>
<p>hi qwiltie, glad you had success. and i always appreciate new little tweaks to make this simple setup better...the gravel is a good idea. looks like you have plenty of room for more faaaarwood...hahah</p>
<p>I'm a single and 50-ish woman. Made three of these easy-peasy. Love it! Thanks for the great idea!</p>
<p>you for sure are welcome. mine are almost full now and standing tall and strong.</p>
Thanks for this awesome idea. Ordered a cord of oak yesterday then realized I didn't have a place for it! Found this online and whipped it together this am with some help from my five year old daughter! Was a snap to put together, despite doing it in -25 degree Canadian winter. Hardest part was clearing the snow from the space!
<p>Hi Grither, glad you and your 5-year-old helper got the project done. And it sure sounds chilly there! Stay warm and enjoy the rack, its worth a grin each time you see it.</p>
<p>This is a great idea! I went out the same day I saw it and got materials to build two racks. I used 8' 4x4s instead of landscape timbers and didn't put any supports in the middle. Works wonderfully! I also laid out 4 bricks under each cider block to serve as a base.</p><p>The only change I might make is to buy 10' 2x4s instead of the 8' that I bought. You lose some length to the portion that's in the block. That's my fault, of course, since you mention getting longer ones. </p>

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