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• Learn about your community warning systems and emergency plans.
• Be prepared for the dangers that can accompany volcanoes:
o Mudflows and flash floods
o Landslides
o Earthquakes
o Ashfall and Acid rain
o Tsunami
• Make evacuation plans.
• Develop an emergency communication plan. In case family members are separated from one another during a volcanic eruption. Ask an out-of-state relative or friend to serve as the family contact. Make sure everyone knows the name, address, and phone number of the contact person.
• Have disaster supplies on hand, like:
o Flashlight and extra batteries
o First aid kit and manual
o Emergency food and water
o Non-electric can opener
o Essential medicines
o Dust masks and goggles for every member of the household
o Sturdy shoes

Step 1: Volcano Eruption

Explotions volcanoes blast hot solid and molten rock fragments and gases into the air. As a result, ash flows can occur on all sides of a volcano and ash can fall hundreds of miles downwind. Dangerous mudflows and floods can occur in valleys leading away from volcanoes. If you live near a known volcano, active or dormant, be prepared to follow volcano safety instructions from your local emergency officials.

Step 2: What Are Mudflows?

Mudflows are powerful “rivers” of mud that can move 20 to 40 mph. Hot ash or lava from a volcanic eruption can melt snow and ice at the summit of a volcano. The melt water quickly mixes with falling ash. It can travel more than 50 miles away from a volcano. If a mudflow is approaching or passes a bridge, stay away from the bridge. Stay out of the area defined as a restricted zone by government officials. Effects of a volcanic eruption can be experienced many miles from a volcano. Mudflows and flash flooding, wildland fires, and even deadly hot ash flow can reach you even if you cannot see the volcano during an eruption. Avoid river valleys and low lying areas.

Step 3: What We Need to Do During a Volcano Eruption?

• Follow the evacuation order issued by authorities.
• Avoid areas downwind and river valleys downstream of the volcano.
• Listen to a battery-operated radio or television for the latest emergency information.
If indoors:
• Close all windows, doors, and dampers.
• Put all machinery inside a garage or barn.
• Bring animals and livestock into closed shelters.
If outdoors:
• Seek shelter indoors.
• If caught in a rockfall, roll into a ball to protect your head.
• If caught near a stream, be aware of mudflows. Move up slope.
During the ash fall:
• Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
• Use goggles to protect your eyes.
• Use a dust mask or hold a damp cloth over your face to help breathing.
• Keep car or truck engines off.


Protect yourself during Ashfall:

• Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
• Use goggles to protect your eyes.
• Use a dust mask or hold a damp cloth over your face to help breathing.
• Keep car or truck engines off.

Step 4: Bibliography

Taken from: Volcanic eruptions, preparations, preventions, mudflows, volcanoes, http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/volcano, October 16 2013.
Please use ONLY your own photos.
<p>or Creative Commons and Public Domain images if they better your explanation.</p>

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